Who is Dr Andrei Timen?

  1. Who is Andrei Timen?

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Dr Andrei Timen

I graduated Faculty of Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca , Romania in 1993. After six months work in large animals I joined Surgery Department In Faculty of Veterinary Medicine Cluj  from 1994 till 2006.

With two colleagues we started also private practice Trivet in 1996 in Cluj-Napoca. In 2002 I graduated the PhD program in orthopaedic surgery. In 2006 I started a new project , Trivet Clinic  with 5 vets  full time employed  where I am practicing now. Cluj-Napoca is the second city in Romania , having more than 500000 habitants and about 60 cabinets and clinics offer veterinary services for pets.15439979_1293073300765382_1452308516314094008_n

  1. Is it hard to be president of Small Animal Association on The Balkans?

I was AMVAC president for 4 years . Now I am Past president since November 2017. AMVAC means more than vets association. It is an honour to be president of Romanian Small Animal Vets Association. The team work is the most important thing and I was lucky to have dedicated colleagues. Every year we try to improve the level of education in our meetings.  In our first conference 12 years ago we had 60 vets and now more than 1100 join every year the congress. During this time we had great support from the veterinary companies and from Romanian Veterinary Chamber. Everybody understood that continuous education will improve the quality of medical acts in all practices.12800187_1033673523372029_6432084009150298114_n

3.How you combine  your professional life and your family life?

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Dr Anderi Timen and his wife

We are a vet family , my wife is also veterinarian so it is very easy to combine those aspects of life. Most of our holidays are linked to veterinary conferences, so the combination is a success one.

4.What do you think about professional level of veterinary medicine on the Balkans?

I am happy to see that the level of veterinary medicine in Balkans is improving day by day. More and more facilities are offered for the pets and the number of vet clinics is bigger every year. It means that we are on a right way and a great benefit will be the insurance program for small animals. I hope that in a few years pet  insurance companies will understand the opportunities to be present in Balkans also.

  1. What are you doing outside of professional life?

I like to practice winter sports, skiing and ice skating. Free time is dedicated to our family members 2 dogs and a cat. Also volunteer projects are taking part of my life.1468572_541932935880810_88657000_n

  1. Your opinion about Vets on The Balkans?

Sharing information between colleagues from this region is very important for the profession.Cooperation between vets from different countries were started and will continue on the benefits of our clients.

 

Do you have the Right Mindset to Success?

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Dr Elli Kalemtzaki

Do you have the Right Mindset to Success?

 

Helen is an exceptional veterinary professional. She’s been running her own veterinary practice for several years now. Her clients love her and have great trust in her.

However, she feels that she has hit a plateau because her business is not growing at the rate she would like. Finding ways to attract new clients is challenging, frustrating and intimidating for her.

She doesn’t really enjoy marketing, and her efforts have been ineffective because she’s uncomfortable promoting herself. She believes that being a good veterinarian should be more than enough to attract new clients to her practice. She relies on word of mouth to attract clients, but with growing competition in the veterinary profession this is no longer enough.

Does Helen’s situation sound familiar? Maybe you are facing similar challenges in attracting more clients and generating the full earnings potential of your business. Vet school did not prepare you for the business world. You had to go through long years of study to obtain the knowledge and skills required to be a good veterinary practitioner. And then you decided to start your own private practice. And this was an entirely new experience. An experience that requires a totally different skill set.

 

You want to make a difference! You are talented at what you are doing and you love helping your patients. But maybe you’re not attracting as many clients as you would like. You assume it will just happen naturally since you are good at what you do. But this is not always the case and this is why you need a marketing strategy in order to make more people aware of what you are offering, to show how you are better than competition and attract more of the clients that you prefer to work with.

 

Helen is in exactly this same place! And she too has been wondering what she could do differently with her business.

 

Marketing can be particularly challenging. Why? Because there’s always the possibility of rejection. When we put out our message and present our services there’s always a possibility that people might not be interested. This is why Helen, like many other veterinary practice owners, tends to avoid or resist marketing activities.

The first thing Helen needs to realize is that her own mindset is the major obstacle to the growth of her business. Like everything else in life, our attitude and mindset determine how we approach something and whether or not we succeed.

Tony Robbins says that 20% of the obstacles are around the mechanics of running a business and 80% have to do with your psychology – that is, your own fears, limits and stories about why your practice isn’t where you want it to be.

Most people think that they need to change their strategy to make real change. Whilst strategy is absolutely important, it’s not the first element to start with. Take a moment and think about your perceived limitations. They may be the “reasons” why you’ve convinced yourself you can’t achieve something.

Here are some of Helen’s limiting beliefs:

  • Marketing is bragging about what I am doing, it feels unnatural. It’s simply not me!
  • If I write this article on pet care nobody will like it and I will make a fool of myself
  • Clients get so frustrated from prices. They constantly blame me for charging them a fortune.

What does it cost Helen to think in this way? The cost is never moving an inch in her marketing, not attracting clients, and staying indefinitely stuck.

Helen has to realize that these thoughts are blocking her success and are probably not true; she needs to start exploring alternative and more realistic beliefs: “Marketing is about helping my clients learn what I am doing and to make informed decisions” or:  “Some people will like my article and might even think I’m smart for writing it.”

This shift of mindset through working with her marketing coach can have a more profound impact on Helen’s marketing effectiveness than anything else.

Marketing is a game of communication. Learning how to communicate in the most appropriate ways will get the attention and interest of your potential clients. The more you communicate, the more the relationship and trust builds.

Do You Want More Practice-Building Support?

 

e.kalemtzaki@gmail.com

 

Ask questions, get engaged, and let me know how I can help you!

INTERNARIONAL VETERINARY STUDENT’S ASSOCIATION – BUCHAREST

ivisaImpressive! These people are our ” future”. They are so young with strong passion and willing to grow and improve their knowledge. Vets on The Balkans will start campain to support their programs and to open new opportunity for them. We ask all our partner to support our new cooperation, because they are our future and they will make the life of our kids better.

 

 

President
Dragoș-Teodor Zamanpr

Senior Vice-President

Cristian Ionică

INTERNARIONAL VETERINARY STUDENT’S ASSOCIATION – BUCHAREST

-Non-profit organisation;

-Led by volunteer veterinary students around the world;

-Founded in 1951

– Our mission: “to benefit the animals and people of the world”

60 countries and 2 super-’national organizationsaaaaaa

BENEFITS

™Group exchanges;

™Individual exchanges (2-6 weeks)

™The annual congress (in summer)

™Symposium (in winter)

™Other local events

IVSA in Romania

IVSA Cluj – Napoca (2008)

IVSA Timișoara (2010)

IVSA Iași (1991)

 

IVSA București (2016)wsava students

 

 

 

Multilobular Osteochondrosarcoma

112 years mix breed dog, F

 

History:  presented for a large firm mass arising from the right side of the calvarium.

 

Findings: A dense, mineralized mass with a stippled appearance arising from the right side of the calvarium, with an approximate diameter of 6cm.

Because of the dense appearance of the mass, it’s hard to appreciate the degree of underlying osteolysis just with an Xray

A CT scan was recommended to evaluate local  invasion.2(1)

 

Diagnostic: the radiological appearance it’s of MLTB (multilobular osteochondrosarcoma)

 

Discussion: MLTB is an uncommon tumour that arises almost exclusively on the flat bones of the skull, mainly on the calvarium, maxilla and mandible and tend to occur in older medium and large breed dogs, although they have been reported in younger and small breed dogs, and have also been reported in cats. It is slow-growing and locally invasive, often recurring after excision. Metastasis may occur

Meet the Founder of VetConsultancy!

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Dr Elli Kalemtzaki

Meet the Founder of VetConsultancy!

 

I’m Elli Kalemtzaki, originally from Greece, but now living and working in Prague. I’m a qualified veterinarian, and have worked in the pet nutrition industry for more than 20 years, the last nine spent with a multinational in an international marketing role. My journey as a trainer and coach started in 2005 when in response to an impactful change in my personal life, I joined a self-awareness course.

It was during this 4 year course that I discovered the connecting threads between everything that was happening to me and most importantly, I discovered my calling. A Veterinary Leadership course in the US in 2006 was yet another life changing experience for me. I began to see my professional role with fresh eyes and became aware of a new mission to use my knowledge and skills supporting others to become successful. This realization transformed my career by giving me the confidence to move from a local position in a Greek company to an international role in a multinational company.

In the last decade I have traveled extensively and have met and worked with amazing people from many different countries and cultures. I gained valuable experience in coaching and mentoring individuals, leading development workshops and training business teams in different countries across Europe. A psychologist coach that I met during the Veterinary Leadership Course inspired me to become a professional coach. So I chose Adler International, an accredited school of coaching in Canada, and received my accreditation from the International Coach Federation in 2010. In the same year I became a certified facilitator of Team Coaching International. My fundamental belief is that we are all creative and resourceful beings, able to achieve the life we desire and deserve. I find the way the human brain works fascinating, and the fact that we can utilize our emotional and mental states to create our desired future absolutely thrilling. This is why I decided to add Neuro Linguistic Programming to my professional ‘tool kit’ and in 2012 I certified as a Practitioner of Neurolinguistic Programming. And then five years ago I relocated to Prague.

Whilst this new experience initially took me out of my comfort zone it also helped me to gain more clarity about my mission to help professional people uncover their unique talents and core values, and how to use strategies and tools to create a more fulfilling and successful life and business career. This is why in 2016 I launched Design for Life to offer coaching and training courses to working women in order to enhance their personal and professional skills and be happier and more successful. Then a year later I started out on an entirely new and independent journey, and left my corporate job to launch my own consultancy business. Combining my marketing with my coaching and training skills my focus now is to help veterinary practice owners build their dream practice, attract more quality clients and achieve their preferred work life balance. I look forward to connecting with you to help you see new possibilities in creating the business and life you desire!

 

Best wishes, Elli Kalemtzaki

Color dilution alopecia

 

Dr Daniela Bajenaru

Dr Daniela Bajenaru

Bajenaru Daniela (Tazy-vet), Bucharest, Romania

 

 

History

Jack, metis, 5 months, adopted from a shelter and treated against Parvovirus infection.
Prinary lesions: alopecia areas on the head, no other types of lesions were observed.
Two weeks after parvovirosis episode, dermatological problem has begun to progress2

 

Physical examination

Poor quality of the hair coat, the hair was thinner and dry
Symetrical hair loss on the auricular pavilions.
Progressive, partial, patchy alopecia and stubble
Non-inflammatory lesions
Non-pruritic31

 

 

 

Investigations

Wood’s lamp examination
Microscopic examination of the skin scrapings
Hair plucks (trichoscopy)
Fungal culture
Biopsy
Histopathological examination

 

Differential diagnosis

 

Dermatophytosis
Demodicosis
Pattern baldness
Color dilution alopecia and other fololicular dysplasias

Laboratory results

Fig.1 Trichoscopy

Fig.1 Trichoscopy

Wood’s lamp examination- Negative
Microscopic examination of the skin scrapings- Negative
Trichoscopy- irregular distribution and clumping of melanin which distorts the hair shaft.
Fungal culture- Negative
Fig 1,2,3,4- Trichoscopy examination: large grains of melanin which distorts the hair shaft.

 

fig 3

fig4

fig4

fig 2

fig 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Skin biopsy and histopathology reveal macromelanosomes, melanin clumping and follicular dysplasia.

 histopathology reveal

histopathology reveal

 

Diagnosis

COLOR DILUTION ALOPECIA

Treatment

There is no effective treatment for this disorder. The disease is progressive and incurable.
avoiding excessive brushing and shampooing
antimicrobial and keratinolytic products only when needed A high-quality DIET and essential fatty acids20170330_18223220170330_181007

Evolution

after 6 months

evolution

evolution

evolution

Full thickness mesh graft in a cat with degloving wound – case presentation

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Delureanu FlorinCristian

Dr Delureanu FlorinCristian

Veterinary Center Otopeni

Bucharest, Romania

 

 

Introduction

An ample loss of skin with underlying tissue and exposure of deep components (eg. tendons, ligaments, bones) define a degloving injury. This kind of wounds are most frequent seen on the distal limbs, medial tarsus/ metatarsus. The main cause of deglowing wounds is car accident, special when the animal is dragged or pushed by a moving car. In all of the cases bacteria and debris are present in the wound.

Free grafts are described as a piece of skin detached from an area of the body and placed over the wound. There are two tipes of free grafts when we talk about graft thickness: full thickness (epidermis and entire dermis); partial/split thickness (epidermis and a variable portion of dermis). Skin grafts are using when exist a defect that cannot be closed by skin flaps or direct apposition. Two factors influence skin graft survival: revascularization and absorbtion of the tissue fluid.

Case report

A 4 years old female shorthair cat, weighting 3,25kg was presented to our clinic. Before that, the owner was at another clinic for consult and he was disappointed because they recommended euthanasia or amputation of the limb. Besides, the first vet treated the cat with Amoxi+Clavulanic Acid and Nekro Veyxym. The owner said that she went missing for about 10 days.

Clinical examination

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Picture 1. Dorsal aspect of the metatarsal wound Deep tissue is affected; low to moderate discharge is present.

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Picture 2. Ventral aspect of the wound; Note the big swelling and the holes at the base of the fingers (red arrows)

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Picture 3. Deep wound with circular aspect, approximate 1,5cm diameter located near saphenous vein

After a thorough clinical exam we found that all was normal excepting the degloving injury. The back right leg was affected. There was a massive inflammation with infection and a lot of debris on the dorsal surface of metatarsal area and ventral, above metatarsal pad. On the dorsal surface of metatarsal area (Picture 1). Besides, also in the ventral area, another wond proximal to the metatarsal pad and 3 deep holes was identified at the base of second, third and fourth finger (Picture 2). It could be distinguished the chronic aspect. A third lesion was registrated on the same leg, in the medial aspect of the thigh. This wound was deep with a circular shape (Picture 3). We estimated that the lesion occurred about two weeks ago. We register pain and high local temperature after palpation. The cat was stable, normothermic, with normal color on mucous membrane, CRT 3seconds and normal superficial lymph nodes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Radiograph of the affected back limb

pirpi

Picture 4a

pirpi1

Picture 4b

Two x-ray views was made to eliminate bone changes or foreign bodies (Picture 4a, Picture 4b).

Picture 4a, 4b- Specialist describe: Suspected slight thickening of phalanges cortical 1 fingers 3-4 and gently bending them. Soft tissue swelling of the tibio-tarso-metatarsian region.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approach 

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Picture 5a

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Picture 5b

After evaluation, the initial recommendation include a good wound management under anesthesia. Before surgical debridment (Picture 5a, 5b), culture was done.

Picture 5a and Picture 5b – Dorsal and ventral aspect of the lesions after surgical debridment

 

Next, wound lavage was initiated with one bag of 500 ml of worm saline (the most easy way to deliver fluids on the wound is to connect the saline bag with a administration set to the syringe and needle with a 3-way stop cock a large amount of liquid is needed to be effective).

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Picture 6. Wound closure by simple interrupted suture.

Finally, this first stage ends with a wet to dry bandage. A primary wound closure was performed for the lesion placed on the medial aspect of the thigh (Picture 6), after intensive cleaning, removal of foreign bodies and dead skin .

Empirically the cat receive Cefquinome until the result arrive and for pain management we administered Tramadol 3mg/kg and Meloxicam 0,1-0,2mg/kg. The cat recover well after anesthesia.

 

 

 

Culture result

One day before performing surgery, we recived the culture result. Streptococcus canis (++++) was identified and was sensible to many antibiotics. Amoxicilin+Clavulanic Acid (Synulox) was initiate for general therapy and chloramphenicol ointment (Opticlor-Pasteur) for local therapy.

Next, a full thickness mesh graft was used on the dorsal aspect of the limb due to the length and depth of the wound and the other wound was left for healing by second intention, both being protected by bandages. In the next 10 day the limb wounds was treated in the same manner. Removal of bacteria, granulation tissue formation and the beginning of epithelization were supported by next bandages as follows: ·

Day 1 – wet-to-dry bandage was used after surgical debridment. (this kind of bandages adhere to the wound and remove the little layer of dead tissue when we take off). Soaked in warm saline 1-2 minutes before removing, they were changed after 24hours one to the other. Cotton gauze was the primary contact-layer of the bandage.

  • Day 2 and day 3
    24.06.2017

    Picture 7a Fresh Sorbalgon is applied on both wounds. This dressing can absorb 20-30 times its weight in fluid, stimulate fibroblast and macrophage activity.

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    Picture 7b Calcium alginate dressing must be changed when the fibres transforms in gel.

– moisture retentive dressing (MDR) – calcium alginate (Sorbalgon-Hartmann) was the primary contact-layer. It is good to use when it exist high exudate like in our patient (Picture 7a, 7b).

 

 

 

  • Day 4,6 and day 9
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Picture 8. Hydrocolloid is indicated because he stimulate granulation and epitelisation and have a good autolytic debridment

– moisture retentive dressing (MDR) – hydrocolloid (Hydrocoll-Hartmann) was the primary contact-layer because the discharge decreased (Picture 8).

 

 

 

 

 

Describing surgical procedure:

IMG_6747

Picture 9. The wound is refreshed by removing the new epithelium formed around the whole wound

Preoperative surgical site preparation: The cat was placed in left lateral recumbency, with the wound exposed. The limb was clipped entirely and povidone iodine and alcohol was used for aseptic surgery. Sterile warm saline 0.9% was use for wound lavage. Meanwhile a colleague prepare the donor site in the same manner- lower cranio-lateral thorax (right side). Almost 1mm of epithelium that has started to grow from the wound edges over the granulation tissue was removed using a thumb forceps and a no. 10 scalpel blade (Picture 9). A perpendicular incision was made right at the edge of haired skin with epithelium. The wound was incised all around and after that the epithelium was removed by advancing the scalpel blade under the epithelium around

the wound. Then, undermining was performed around the wound edges. A fragment of sterile surgical drape was used over the wound to get the exact shape. The drape “pattern” was placed to the donor area.

 

 

To maintain the wound moist, i placed over it a cotton gauze moistened in warm sterile saline 0.9% while the graft is transferred.

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Picture 10. The donor site-removing the skin; black arrow show the direction of the hair groth.

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Picture 11a. Skin from dorsal thorax is advanced

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Picture 11b. Simple interrupted suture is used for skin closure.

The direction of hair groth was marked with a black arrow above the donor site so that the direction of the hair groth on the graft will be the same as the hair groth direction on the skin surrounding the wound. After that, the margins of the drape “pattern” was traced on the skin. The skin of the donor bed was incised with No.10 scalpel balde and removed using thumb forceps and Metzenbaum scissors (Picture 10). The defect left after removing the graft was primary closed by undermining and advancing the skin edges with walking sutures using 3-0 monofilament absorbable suture material and finally the skin was sutured in a simple interrupted suture manner using 2-0 monofilament absorbable suture (Picture 11a, 11b).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preparing the graft

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Picture 12. Final aspect of the skin graft after removal

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Picture 13. The skin is stretched on the receiving bed so the incisions made in it expand.

The dermal side of the graft was placed on a polystyrene board with a thickness of 10cm covered with a sterile drape and after that we fixed and stretched with 21G needles. The subcutaneous tissue was removed from the graft. Next, made parallel incisions was made in the graft, 0.5-0.7cm long and apart (Picture 12). At the end, the graft was placed on the granulation bed and sutured with 4-0 monofilament nonabsorbable suture in a simple interrupted suture manner. Additional tacking suture was placed to ensure the expansion of the mesh incision and allow the fluid drainage (Picture 13).

 

 

Choosing the right bandage after grafting and aftercare

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Picture 14. Grassolind is ointment free of medication, broad mesh, air permeable and exudate; impregnated with neutral ointment. Ointment contain petroleum jelly, fatty acid esters, carbonate and bicarbonate diglycerol, synthetic wax.

It is important to use a nonadherent primary dressing. My initial choise was Grassolind (Hartmann), is sufficiently porous to allow easy passage of exudate from the wound surface, preventing maceration of surrounding tissue (Picture 14). The ventral metatarsal wound maintain hydrocolloid dressing (Hydrocoll-Hartmann) as primary layer. After that, a thin layer of chloramphenicol oinment (Opticlor-Pasteur) was used all around both wounds and over the graft.

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Picture 15. Note that the “half clamshell” is extended with approximately 1cm toward fingers (red arrow) so the leg does not touch the ground

Over the first dressings was applied 5cmx5cm compress (Medicomp-Hartmann) and a roll gauze was the second layer. After a few laps of gauze stirrups was placed to secure the bandage in place. Extemporaneous half “clamshell” splint (Picture 15) was made from plastic material wich was curved in such a way that the limb was fixed in semi flexion. The splint is a little bit longer than the extremity of the pelvic limb (“toe-dancing” position), thus provide a maximum relief pressure. In the proximal area, under the splint, I put cotton to prevent pressure injuries on the caudal aspect of the thigh. Applied from proximal to distal and with moderate tension, elastic warp was the final protective layer of the bandage and it was secured at the proximal end with tape.

 

 

 

 

Changing bandages

The bandage was changed in day 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 post op. In day 10 the suture material was removed from the graft and from the donor site. From day 17 to day 29 hydrogel (Hydrosorb-Hartmann) was used as primary bandage layer and the bandage was changed from 4 to 4 days. In day 29 no discharge was present in the bandage; the wound was completely healed and 0,2-0,4 mm of hair was present in the center of the graft.

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Picture 16. Delayed healing on day 45 – epitelization stopped at this level.

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Picture 17b. Honey improve wound nutrition, promotes the granulation tissue and epithelization, reduce inflammation and edema. Also it has a wide antibacterial effect.

20170918_112216

Picture 17a. DTL laser type is alaser light emitting diode in the red field (wavelength 650 nm) and infrared (wavelength 808 nm) of the light spectrum with next clinical effect: anesthetic effect; decreases edema and inflammation; activates microcirculation; stimulates wound healing; improves tissue trophicity; reflexogenic effect.

A delayed healing occurred at the wound in the ventral region (Picture 16). From day 29 to day 59 epithelization has advanced very hard and granulation tissue has captured an appearance of ulcer (in this time the wound was asepseptic prepared and hydrocolloid and hydrogel was used as primary layer bandage and without the splint). In day 59 the wound was refreshed on the surface with a scalpel blade and laser therapy (Picture 17a) and medical Manuka honey (Picture 17b) was used daily for 14 days. After that, a complete healing was reached.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Illustrating wounds evolution after surgery

 

Day 1

IMG_6795IMG_6797

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Day 11

 

IMG_6873 IMG_6879

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Day 28

IMG_4671 IMG_4677

 

 

 

 

 

 

Day 35

DSC09254 DSC09263

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Day 49

DSC09686 DSC09689

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Day 11 after honey and laser therapy

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 Day 16 after honey and laser therapy

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Comparing day 1 and after 3 Months

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Vets must ‘dare to speak out’

WSAVA imageVets must ‘dare to speak out’

Urgent action on brachycephalic dogs called for during panel discussion at FECAVA/WSAVA/DSAVA Congress in Copenhagen

 

The rise in the popularity of so-called brachycephalic (flat-faced) breeds, including pugs and French bulldogs, is linked to concerning trends for dog health and welfare, according to the Federation of European Companion Animal Veterinary Associations (FECAVA), the World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA) and the Danish Small Animal Veterinary Association (DSAVA/FHKS).

 

Experts from around the world discussed the issues facing these breeds and the implications for veterinarians during a panel session following a lecture stream dedicated to hereditary disease and the importance of responsible breeding on Tuesday 26 September during FECAVA-WSAVA Congress in Copenhagen. More than 200 delegates attended, including Danish TV celebrity, Sebastian KIein, well known for his interest in animal welfare issues. At the end of the session, panel members issued a number of recommendations to help veterinarians to take steps to improve the health and welfare of brachycephalic dogs (see below).

 

During discussions, panel members were questioned on strategies to help address the problem in particular countries. Panellist Helle Friis Proschowsky explained that The Nordic Kennel Union had issued recommendations and breed-specific guidelines for judges but acknowledged that the majority of brachycephalic dogs in all countries were unlikely to be registered with a kennel club. Panellist Peter Sandøe confirmed that only 15% of French bulldogs in Denmark were registered, the majority coming from unregistered breeders.  “The education of owners remains the most important priority,” commented Helle Friis Proschowsky.

 

‘Dare to speak out’

Soft tissue surgeon and panellist Laurent Findji said he had seen the explosion in the popularity of French bulldogs at first hand because of the number he was now operating on. FECAVA Vice President Wolfgang Dohne called on vets to help brachycephalic dogs but to advise owners to neuter their animals if they have conformation-altering disorders. Panellist Gudrun Ravetz, Senior Vice President of the British Veterinary Association said that, in the UK, owners and breeders now consent to having conformation-altering surgery reported: “However, while a recent BVA survey showed that 67% of vets say they see breed-related problems, few submit conformation-altering data to the Kennel Club though this would support the development of evidence-based solutions.” She added: “As veterinarians we must educate ourselves.”

 

“Vets should dare to speak out,” commented panellist Kristin Wear Prestrud. “We must educate owners on all health and welfare matters, whether we are simply advising them that their dog is overweight or if we need to give advice on breeding or refuse planned Caesarean sections.”

 

Urge advertisers to stop using images of flat-faced dogs

Toril Moseng, President of the Norwegian Veterinary Association, highlighted initiatives carried out in Norway, including an awareness-raising petition signed by 1,700 veterinarians; a press release urging advertisers not to use brachycephalic breeds in campaigns and a hand-out produced for brachycephalic breed owners, letting them know ‘what to expect.’ Similar work has been done by the British Veterinary Association explained Gudrun Ravetz. “We contacted advertisers and many apologised saying that they were simply unaware of the problems.”

 

Commenting on the session, DSAVA President Anne Sørensen said: “The fact that so many participated so actively in the discussion shows the seriousness with which veterinarians view this issue. There is no easy answer but by working together and sharing experiences and successes, we will start to change the minds of pet owners who think that these animals are cute when many of them are, in fact, born into a life of suffering. We thank all those who joined us to highlight this important issue and especially Sebastian Klein. His attendance has helped us to highlight the issue to the dog-owning public in Denmark.”

 

Education and raising awareness

FECAVA President Jerzy Gawor commented: “As veterinarians, we put the best interests of our patients first. For affected animals – including flat-faced dogs but also cats and rabbits – this may involve performing surgical procedures to correct or overcome conformational disorders, such as enlarging the nostrils, shortening the soft palate, correcting the bite or performing Caesarean sections. We are concerned that these procedures – which should be exceptional – are becoming the norm in many brachycephalic breeds.”

 

WSAVA President Walt Ingwersen added: “Our members see the results of extreme brachycephalic confirmation in practice on a regular basis and it is one of our top animal welfare concerns. The discussion panel helped to highlight the complex issues raised by the popularity of these breeds and to explore potential solutions. A reduction in the health problems faced by these breeds will be most effectively achieved through the education of veterinary professionals, breeders and owners and through leadership and consensus-building between stakeholders.”

 

Vets should ‘show leadership’

All three associations committed to develop and contribute to initiatives that aim to address the health and welfare of these animals. Panellist Professor Åke Hedhammar, member of the WSAVA Hereditary Disease Committee and scientific advisor to the Swedish Kennel Club, stressed: “We will continue to work with all stakeholders who can positively influence and improve the health and welfare of brachycephalic breeds. Extreme phenotypes should be avoided and, in the show ring, moderation of such phenotypes should be rewarded. Animals showing extremes of conformation that negatively impact their health and welfare should not be used for breeding.”

 

FECAVA past president Monique Megens, who chaired the discussion, concluded: “As advocates of and experts in animal health and welfare, veterinarians should speak up and show leadership in taking action against the breeding of dog with excessive traits leading to health and welfare problems. The great attendance at the panel discussion shows the willingness of the profession to do so. We hope that the recommendations prepared by our panellists will be adopted by veterinarians and by veterinary associations all over the world, leading to a future with healthy and happy dogs.”

 

 

 

 

Notes for Editors

 

  • The World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA) aims to advance the health and welfare of companion animals worldwide through creating an educated, committed and collaborative global community of veterinary peers. It currently represents more than 200,000 veterinarians through 105 member associations. Its annual World Congress brings together globally respected experts to offer cutting edge thinking on all aspects of companion animal veterinary care.

 

  • The Federation of European Companion Animal Veterinary Associations (FECAVA) is the platform for the promotion of the professional development and representation of companion animal veterinarians in Europe. Founded in 1990, it currently has 40 national member associations and 13 associate member associations. FECAVA represents over 25,000 companion animal practitioners throughout Europe.

 

  • The Danish Small Animal Veterinary Association (SvHKS) represents small animal veterinarians in Denmark and has around 1,000 members. It was the host organisation for the 2017 FECAVA/WSAVA Congress.

 

  • Members of the expert panel were:
  • Peter Sandøe (DK) – professor of ethics and welfare
  • Helle Friis Proschowsky (DK) – vet working with the Danish Kennel Club
  • Laurent Findji (FR/UK) – specialist in soft tissue surgery
  • Gudrun Ravetz (UK) – Senior Vice President, British Veterinary Association
  • Kristin Wear Prestrud (NO) – veterinary scientific director of the Norwegian Kennel Club
  • Åke Hedhammar (SE), professor em. in internal medicine (companion animals), veterinary consultant for the Swedish Kennel Club and member of the WSAVA Hereditary Disease Committee.

 

  • Media contacts:

Karin de Lange, FECAVA Press officer kdelange@invivo.edu

Rebecca George, WSAVA Press Officer Rebecca@georgepr.com

Anne Sørensen, President, DSAVA (SvHKS) anne.dsava@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

Expert recommendations: the vet’s role

 

Following the panel discussion on the health and welfare of brachycephalic dogs on 26 September, the expert panel issued a number of recommendations for veterinarians as below:

 

As advocates of, and experts in, animal health and welfare, veterinarians should speak up and show leadership in taking action against the breeding of dogs with excessive traits which can lead to health and welfare problems, such as brachycephalic obstructive airway syndrome (BOAS).

 

At a PRACTICE level, veterinarians should:

 

  1. Advise the public not to buy animals with extreme conformation. This applies both to breeds and to individual dogs.

 

  1. Raise awareness among dog owners and advise them about health and welfare issues in dogs with extreme conformations.

 

  1. Raise awareness among breeders, breed clubs and show judges and advise them as to health and welfare issues in dogs with extreme conformations. Take an active role in pre-breeding examinations and in giving advice regarding potential breeding stock.

 

  1. Inform dog owners and breeders about breeding restrictions if a dog is surgically treated for BOAS or other problems related to extreme traits linked to breeding. (In countries where no such restrictions exist, strongly advise against breeding.) Advise neutering at the time of surgery if good practice allows.

 

  1. Share data on health and welfare issues related to extreme breeding. Where a national submission system exists, submit details on conformation-altering surgery and caesarean sections related to extreme breeding traits.

 

 

At PROFESSIONAL ORGANISATION level, veterinarians should:

 

  1. Implement a communication campaign to proactively raise awareness among the public in general and to advise them about health and welfare issues in dogs with extreme conformations.

 

  1. Work together with national cynological organisations and other stakeholders to set up registers of confirmation-altering surgeries and caesarean sections as well as relevant screening programmes (ie pre-breeding examinations).

 

  1. Call for the revision of breed standards to help prevent BOAS and other brachycephalic-related disorders. Breed standards should include evidence-based limits on physical features (eg muzzle length) and approaches such as outcrossing should be considered.

 

  1. Launch and distribute veterinary health certificates for puppies and/or checklists for prospective buyers in support of responsible, healthy breeding.

 

  1. Develop evidence-based international standardised protocols for the examination of breeding animals regarding respiratory function and thermoregulation.

 

  1. Set up systems allowing the gathering of data from veterinary practices regarding health and welfare-related issues in dogs with extreme conformations.

 

  1. Set up undergraduate training / CPD to equip vets to take a more active role in providing breeding advice to breeders, breeder organisations and judges, related to extreme conformation and screening procedures.

 

Copenhagen, 26 September 2017.

Fourth Bulgarian Congress for Veterinary Cardiology Sofia, 2017 is about to happen

04-05 th  November 2017

A two day summit organized by the Bulgarian Association for Veterinary Cardiology (BAVC).

 

Main topic

lector

Dr Luca Ferasin

Feline Cardiology

 

Main Congress speaker:

Dr Luca Ferasin

DVM PhD CertVC PGCert(HE) DipECVIM-CA (Cardiology) GPCert(B&PS) MRCVS

European & RCVS Specialist in Cardiology

Lumbry Park Veterinary Specialists, UK

 

Dr Ferasin graduated with honours in 1992 from Bologna University. After 3y research in endocrinology in Cambridge he was awarded his PhD in 1996. Following 3y as Assistant Professor at Padua University, he moved to Bristol University, where he taught cardio-respiratory medicine of the dog and cat for 7 years. In 2005-2007 was Associate Professor in Cardiology at the University of Minnesota. Between 2008 and 2014 he ran his own cardiology consultancy company, comprising a mix of private clinical referral work, telemedicine and post-graduate teaching. In March 2014 he joined CVS Referrals and he is currently Clinical Director of Lumbry Park Veterinary Specialists, in Hampshire, UK. He obtained RCVS certificate in cardiology in 2001, certificate in Teaching & Learning in Higher Education in 2002, ECVIM diploma (cardiology) in 2004 and certificate in Business & Professional Studies in 2011. He has vastly contributed to the veterinary literature with articles, abstracts, and book chapters, including the recent chapter on coughing in the Ettinger’s textbook of Internal Medicine. He is a regular speaker at National and International veterinary conferences.logo

Scientific program

04 November 2017, Saturday

9.00 – 9.45           Registration

9.45 – 10.00        Welcome from the current Chairman of BAVC – Ranko Georgiev, DVM

10.00 – 11.30      Clinical approach to the feline cardiac patient. – Luca Ferasin, DVM

11.30 – 11.45      coffee break

11.45 – 13.15      Approach to cats with dyspnoea, arrhythmia, syncope and hyperthyroidism.” – Luca Ferasin, DVM

13.15 – 14.00      lunch break

14.00 – 16.00      Short clinical case presentations – “From vets to vets”

16.00 – 16.30      coffee break

16.30 – 17.00      open panel discussion – “How many cats with a heart disease I see in my every day practice? How many see me? J”

 

05 November 2017, Sunday

9.15 – 10.00        coffee and free communications

10.00 – 11.30      Feline cardiomyopathy and arterial thromboembolism.” – Luca Ferasin, DVM

11.30 – 11.45      coffee break

11.45 – 13.15      Management of feline heart failure – Luca Ferasin, DVM

13.15 – 14.00      lunch break

14.00 – 16.00      Short clinical case presentations – “From vets to vets”

16.00 – 16.30      coffee break

16.30 – 17.00      open panel discussion – “My approach for treatment and long term management of Feline Cardiomyopathies.”

17.00 – 17.15      Closing words from the current Chairman of BAVC – Ranko Georgiev, DVM

 

General Information

When                                   The first weekend of November – 04 and 05.11.2017

Where                                  Vitosha Park Hotel Sofia – see the map below for instructions

Language                             English, translation not provided

Price                                      BAVC 2017 members      free (registration still mandatory)

Vet students                      free (10 places available, registration still mandatory)

Non BAVC members      100 lv (50 EU)

Registration                       Maximum number of participants – 90; early registration/payment will guarantee your participation; if places still available, the payment could be on    site, at the day of the Congress

How to                                 Fill the registration form (at www.bavc.bg); the fee should be transferred in the bank account provided there in advance

More                                     Every participant will receive a Certificate of attendance, together with the Congress proceedings and a T-shirt.

If you have other questions and/or suggestions concerning the summit, please contact Dr Ranko Georgiev – rankoge@gmail.com

Venue                                  Vitosha Park Hotel, Rosario 1 str., Studentski grad, Sofia 1700, BG

Erythema multiforme or TEN (toxic epidermal necrolysis – toxic shock syndrome)

stef art

Marina-Ştefania Stroe, DVM

Marina-Ştefania Stroe, DVM

Romania

History

Dog, half breed, M, intact, 4 years old, unvaccinated and without treatment for intestinal parasites, fleas and ticks, 10.2 kg.

The main concern was the ophthalmologic problem.

Three weeks ago he had problems with the hind limbs and he had difficulty in moving. Previous treatments: meloxicam, gentamicin, steroidal anti-inflammatory.

The possibility of ingestion of a toxic (plant / substance) is not excluded.

Clinical exam

-white mucous membranes, no lesions in the oral cavity;

-necroses in the auricular pavilions with a visible marginal line, foreskin necrosis, yellow crusts and areas of necrosis predominantly on the posterior limbs, tail, dry-looking fur, which is easily detached;

-after detachment, the skin is denuded, ulcerated, very painful on palpation;

-cutaneous hyperesthesia;

-minimal normal auricular secretion;

-corneal erosions, dry eyes, agglutinated secretions at this level;

-faded cardiac noise; imperceptible pulse;

-rectal examination: doughy feces consistency, normal color;

-abdomen in tension;

-blood pressure (indirect oscilometric metod): 138/102 (112 mmHg).

Picture4Picture3

TESTS

-Chest and abdomen rx and ultrasonography: free fluid; enlarged spleen.

-Ultrasound guided abdominal puncture: yellowish ascitic fluid, orange tint, after spinning small, white deposit. Protein: 1 g / 100 ml.

-Blood tests: low red blood cell counts, thrombocytopenia, leukocytosis, granulocytosis; elevated liver transaminases, bilirubin and amylase normal values, normal kidney parameters.

-Bleeding time: normal.

-Negative tests for infectious diseases.

-Abdomenocentesis: 335 ml of ascitic fluid and cytological exam: MODIFIED TRANSSUDAT WITH ERYTHROCYTE POLLUTION

Picture6

Fig 10

Picture5

Fig 9

Fig. 9: Cutaneous cytology, direct impression smear from necroses of the pinnae (Fig.10): nonsegmentated immature young neutrophils, lymphocytes, few macrophages in whose cytoplasm are found bacilli, bacterial population predominantly represented by bacilli, but also cocci, oxyphilic cell matrix

Fig. 11: Cutaneous cytology, direct impression smear from yellow scale, tail (Fig. 12): neutrophils in all stages: mature segmented, degenerative stage, but also young with eukromatic nucleus and evident nucleoli, macrophages with basophilic cytoplasm, slightly vacuolized, eucromatic nucleus, nucleic streamming, erythrocyte infiltrate.

Fig. 14: Tape prep from yellow scale, hind limb

keratinocytes on the surface of which are attached cocci, degenerate inflammatory cells

Picture7(1)

Fig 11

Picture8(1)

Fig 12

Fig. 13: Trichogram – hair with normal structure, some hair with degraded cuticle, rap A / T: 4/6, follicular cast, negative for demodex and dermatophytes.

Picture10

Fig 14

Picture9

Fig 13

Superficial and deep skin scrapes: negative.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Picture11

Fig 15

Fig. 15:

-Direct and consensual pupil reflex present;

-Reduced visual acuity;

– Schirmmer test 0 mm / min;

-Florescein test: Positive

Diagnosis: OU Corneal melting ulcer F +

Diagnosis and other differentials

Blood smear, cell morphology: moderate, hypochromic, regenerative anemia,; leukocytosis, neutrophilia, moderate non-specific cellular toxic status, eosinopenia, lymphopenia. In this case, the leukogram (neutrophilia, eosinopenia and lymphopenia) may suggest treatment with corticosteroids, stress, hyperadrenocorticism, severe inflammation (chronic) with various etiologies (viral, bacterial, fungal).

Skin biopsy: histopathological aspects advocate for hyperkeratosis with paracheratosis and chronic inflammatory response involving the epidermis, jonctional area and superficial epidermis.

Final diagnosis

Histopathological aspects may show Erythema multiforme or TEN (toxic epidermal necrolysis – toxic shock syndrome), which is a late reaction, surprised in a chronic, secondary phase due to fibroblast proliferation.

 

The toxic shock syndrome may be a reaction to drugs, chemicals or food

 

Treatment

Enrofloxacin (dose: 5 mg / kg) at 12h po;

Amoxicillin and clavulanic acid (dose: 20 mg / kg) at 12h po;

Furosemide (dose: 5 mg / kg) at 12h iv;

Tramadol (dose: 2mg / kg) at 12h iv;

Parenteral nutrition;

Bathing (chlorhexidine);

Acetylcysteine, Tobrex, Corneregel 6-7 times / day (lack of tears).