ABCD & Boehringer Ingelheim invite applications for the 2018 Young Scientist Award

 

abcdThe European Advisory Board on Cat Diseases (ABCD) invites applications for the 2018 ABCD & Boehringer Ingelheim Award, which aims to reward innovative and outstanding work by promising young professionals in the field of feline infectious diseases and/or immunology.

 

Candidates should have made an original contribution to the field of feline infectious diseases and/or immunology, which has been published or accepted for publication in a referenced journal (PubMed, Web of Science, Web of Knowledge) or accepted by another assessing body (e.g. a Thesis Committee) in 2016 or later.

 

Candidates should be based in Europe (EU or EFTA country), have completed a veterinary or biomedical curriculum, and ideally be under 35 years of age at the time of application.

 

Applications should be made in English in an electronic format and include a short abstract (max. 500 words) of the work the applicant wishes to submit, as well as a short curriculum vitae and two personal references. Any relevant publications and/or dissertation on the topic should be included. The deadline for submission is 15 March 2018.

 

The award (1000€) is funded by Boehringer Ingelheim and will be presented by the ABCD at the congress of the International Society of Feline Medicine, to be held from 28 June to 1 July 2018 in Sorrento, Italy. The award winner will receive a complimentary registration to this congress. Return travel expenses and accommodation will also be covered to allow the laureate to attend the event. The winner is expected to give a short presentation or present a poster of his/her findings at this event.

 

The recipient of the 2017 Award was Maciej Parys (University of Edinburgh).

 

Application forms and detailed rules can be downloaded from the ABCD web site (www.abcdcatsvets.org)

For further information, please contact Karin de Lange, ABCD secretary, karin.delange@abcd-vets.org

10334323_1650417485231859_7490271749546982451_n

 

 

 

 

Porencephaly in a pug dog with seizures – case report

 

 

421347_10151629937179640_1038846606_nDr Miroslav Todorov

Veterinary Clinic Blue Cross

Sofia, Bulgaria

 

Case presentation: a 3 and a half year old female pug dog was presented at the Bluecross Veterinary Clinic in Sofia for additional diagnostics in view of resently started seizure events.

A month ago the dog started having problems with its hind left limb and another vet started him on prednisolone. The limping improved but 20 days later the dog started having seizures.

The patient was examined at the Bluecross Veterinary Clinic in Blagoevgrad within two hours after one of the seizures. At that stage the dog wasn‘t able to see properly and showed a tendency to circle to the left. Blood was taken for Cbc and biochemistry analysis and the results were normal. The patient was started on an antiepileptics drug – Phenobarbital and the steroids were continued (because of the high possibility of an inflammatory process). An examination at the clinic in Sofia and additional advance imaging were scheduled.2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

Clinical examination:

good general condition, slight difficulties in breathing (because of the brachiocephalic syndrome), normal heart and lung sounds, normal temperature.

Neurological examination: a little overexcited behaviour (but it was impossible to tell if this behaviour was abnormal for the dog or not). Normal cranial nerve reflexes, no nysgmus or circling, normal pupillary light reflexes. There was slight spinal ataxia in all four limbs. The proprioceptive tests were normal on all four. On the hind left limb the dog has pattelar luxation second degree (this explains the limping epizode a month ago). From the video provided by the owner it could be observed that the dog was demonstrating clonic- tonic seizure.

The owner was questioned for possible toxins, drugs and plants that could be the reason for the seizures but he said that the dog couldn’t have eaten anything abnormal.

A forebrain lesion was localised but the possibility of a multifocal process was very high.

The blood results were normal; therefore, possible extracranial reasons for the seizures were excluded. Toxin exposure was excluded by the anamnesis.

The list of differential diagnoses was:

  1. Inflammatory process – Necrotizing Meningoencephalitis (NME or Pug encephalitis)
  2. Idiopathic epilepsy
  3. Brain neoplasia
  4. Congenital lesion- hydrocephalus, cysts

To exclude most of the diagnoses from the list, advance imaging was performed – MRI 1,5tesla was used. The test was done with and without contrast material.

On the MRI we discovered a bilateral enlargement at the cranial part of both lateral ventricles within the frontal lobe of the brain. There was a visible communication between the ventricles and the subarachnoid space at the level of the eyes. They looked like cystic lesions filled with CSF. Bilateral loss of brain tissue was observed in both hemispheres. Around the cavities the cerebral cortex was reduced. These bilateral lesions could explain all the clinical signs that this dog was showing – seizures and the ataxia of all four limbs. There are motor cortex within the frontal lobe of the brain. There was no contrast enchantment after injection of contrast material within the brain tissue.

Therapeutic plan: the dog antiepileptic treatment was continued and regular measurements of the level of phenobarbital were scheduled. I added proton pump inhibitor –Esomeprazole (S enantiomer of omeprazole) because the drug has the effect of reducing the cerebrospinal fluid production. The steroids are slowly taped and they will be discontinued after two weeks.

The dog’s condition will be monitored by the owner and the vets at the BlueCross Veterinary Clinic in Blagoevgrad. In case of progression, especially after we stop the steroids, the necessity to take a CSF sample in order to finally exclude an inflammatory process is being discussed with the owner.

Porencephaly is a rare congenital cerebral defect and it is described in several reports in the field of veterinary medicine. It is more commonly seen in ruminants but there are few reports about dogs and cats.

There are few cystic congenital lesions of the brain, including focal lesions (porencephaly), extensive lesions (hydranencephaly) and very rarely schizencephaly (more commonly seen in humans). In porencephaly the defect creates a communication between the lateral ventricles and the subarachoid space. In schizencephaly the defect may be surrounded by a ring of polymicroglia. The schizencephalic defects are lined by gray matter.

The most frequent classification of these lesions based on their pathogenesis divides these defects into two major categories: developmental and encephaloclastic. Developmental porencephaly is due to a focal neuronal migration disorder, leaving a gap in the developing cerebral hemisphere. Encephaliclastic porencephaly includes cerebral cavities that result from tissue breakdown of various etiologies (cerebral ischemia, infection, trauma). In utero infection is the most common reason, especially in ruminants.

The interesting thing is that this type of lesions are congenital in nature but the clinical signs can start after the birth of the animal (which should be expected from the age) or sometimes later in life (after a few years).

According to the few reports about this type of pathology, the progression of the disease is different in every case. Some of those are completely asymptomatic, other cases are well controlled with drugs (antiepileptic drugs) third – their condition worsened, with poor control on drugs and some of those were euthanized. There was one report on a case of hydranencephaly where a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was placed and the dog’s condition slightly improved. Therefore, this is also a therapeutic option in some of those severe cases.

 

References:

  1. Porencephaly and cortical dysplasia as cause of seizures in a dog: Gisele Fabrino, Maria-Gisela Laranjeira, Augusto Schweigert and Guilherme Dias de Melo BMC Veterinary Research 2012
  2. Porencephaly and hydranencephaly in six dogs: Davies ES1, Volk HA, Behr S, Summers B, de Lahunta A, Syme H, Jull P, Garosi L. Vet Rec. 2012 Feb
  3. Porencephaly in dogs and cats: Magnetic resonance imaging findings and clinical signs: Schmidt MJ1, Klumpp S, Amort K, Jawinski S, Kramer M. Vet Radiol Ultrasound. 2012
  4. Porencephaly in dogs and cats: relationships between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features and hippocampal atrophy: Ai HORI, Kiwamu HANAZONO, Kenjirou MIYOSHI and Tetsuya NAKADE, J Vet Med Sci. 2015

Our last 12 months…or our 12 people who have changed our journal!!!

Here we would like to share with you our last year, but in a different way. We will present  12 people who made last year amazing, different and really lovely for the journal

  January 

22046849_10214915649994068_7874895165758875388_n

Luigi Venco

Dr Luigi Venco – I think, he is one of the most popular vet in Europe. Dear Luigi, Thank you so much for your strong support and real and lovely friendship. Proud to know you!Love you!

 

 

 

 

 

  February

21768145_1684907608187552_7594262391301063314_n

Lea Kreszinger

Dr Lea Kreszinger- I can say a HUGE heart, collecting so much goodness and positive intention. Thank you for all you did for Vets on The Balkans. If you see her one time ,you will remeber her for sure, if she is your friend, she will be in your heart forever.

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

March 

13082781_994903797284536_7281255570377216529_n

Mila Bobadova

Dr Mila Bobadova- OMG , she is a real lady. Always say “YES” to Vets on The Balkans, always ready for ideas and  thank you so much that you share with us your power and positive intention. Thank you for having you!

 

 

 

 

 

April

18447230_1892182757720873_4260551463960048946_n

Katharina Brunner

Dr Katharina Brunner – When she is around you, you recieve all the peace and love from all over the world. If you feel her hugs, you would want to feel this all your life, REAL FRIEND! Thank you for all you did for Vets on The Balkans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

May

12928154_10207116972815873_7210979440410887041_n

Ann Criel

Dr Ann Criel- high possition in the veterinary society, but what a feeling to be your friend, so grounded, so funny,so lovely. Always supportive! Thank you for being such a friend!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June

20257971_1818209914872542_9139402426566767241_n

Alberto Cordero

Dr Alberto Cordero- What is Mexico in your mind? Sunny, beach, hot, pleasure…yes, What he is? The same feeling when you are his friend, always smile, positive energy and so much friendly support! I am proud to be your friend

 

 

 

 

 

July

24862312_1800386146639730_788096211046599906_n

Luca Formaggini

Dr Luca Formaggini – italian energy, aways smiling, with jokes and positive intention, you are BIG Frieand of Vets on The Balkans. Thank you for everthing. Please be the same in 2018 :)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

August

1011455_555100874532206_1020389694_n

Ranko Georgiev

Dr Ranko Georgiev – the best cardiologist in Bulgaria and always open for Vets on The Balkans, and the most important close and real friend. Thank you so much for being you! Keep going!

 

 

 

 

 

September

21764787_10155100978953391_5309462312955899710_n

Jolle Kripensteijn

Dr Jolle Kripensteijn- Do you know the feeling when you meet someone and you have the feeling that you know that person all your life? It is Jolle. You start speaking with this “foreigner” and you feel so free to speak without thinking what and how to say something, so much freedom, so much understanding and warming. Thank you so much for having you!

 

 

 

 

October

22854664_789230587923222_1976661440_n

Elli Klemtzaki

Dr Elli Klemtzaki – a cute lady with HUGE heart, always supportive, always open to us, she is this word “always” . Thank you for all you did!

 

 

 

 

 

 

November 

12814393_1673705086236432_1339900710371625092_nPAMAS TRADING SRL- our super partner, our friend, our BIGGEST SUPPORT! Thank you so much, Vets on The Balkans is avaible because of you!

 

 

 

 

December 

23316272_180060419216123_164154967085808895_nBLUE SKY COMMERCE-  our second partner! Such a pleasure to have you and to work with you!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WITH ALL MY LOVE

 

Luba Gancheva

Christmas News! Bravo Bulgaria!

25442768_1576961642350193_8145106940698514483_nA FOUR PAWS team together with bulgarian veterinarians were on site to transfer the pregnant lioness Raya and her partner Hector to a safe place. The conditions in Razgrad Zoo aren’t appropriate for a birth, so it is necessary to transfer them now. Good news from the ultrasound: The cub is healthy, expected birth date is in 2-3 weeks.23795031_1553305748049116_1213372497055135105_n 23843082_1553305751382449_2492045853743789465_n 23915484_1553306148049076_3600530369129028540_n 24068161_1554210984625259_354602558747149375_n

Four out of five lions were checked thoroughly. The last male lion was in critical condition and is transported to Sofia for thorough examination.

 

We are pround that this happened on The Balkans  and we are able to be part of the world veterinary journay.

Who is Dr Andrei Timen?

  1. Who is Andrei Timen?

10556215_753379624734755_6265858383642356526_n

Dr Andrei Timen

I graduated Faculty of Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca , Romania in 1993. After six months work in large animals I joined Surgery Department In Faculty of Veterinary Medicine Cluj  from 1994 till 2006.

With two colleagues we started also private practice Trivet in 1996 in Cluj-Napoca. In 2002 I graduated the PhD program in orthopaedic surgery. In 2006 I started a new project , Trivet Clinic  with 5 vets  full time employed  where I am practicing now. Cluj-Napoca is the second city in Romania , having more than 500000 habitants and about 60 cabinets and clinics offer veterinary services for pets.15439979_1293073300765382_1452308516314094008_n

  1. Is it hard to be president of Small Animal Association on The Balkans?

I was AMVAC president for 4 years . Now I am Past president since November 2017. AMVAC means more than vets association. It is an honour to be president of Romanian Small Animal Vets Association. The team work is the most important thing and I was lucky to have dedicated colleagues. Every year we try to improve the level of education in our meetings.  In our first conference 12 years ago we had 60 vets and now more than 1100 join every year the congress. During this time we had great support from the veterinary companies and from Romanian Veterinary Chamber. Everybody understood that continuous education will improve the quality of medical acts in all practices.12800187_1033673523372029_6432084009150298114_n

3.How you combine  your professional life and your family life?

20638043_888698351306590_3361956573765158781_n

Dr Anderi Timen and his wife

We are a vet family , my wife is also veterinarian so it is very easy to combine those aspects of life. Most of our holidays are linked to veterinary conferences, so the combination is a success one.

4.What do you think about professional level of veterinary medicine on the Balkans?

I am happy to see that the level of veterinary medicine in Balkans is improving day by day. More and more facilities are offered for the pets and the number of vet clinics is bigger every year. It means that we are on a right way and a great benefit will be the insurance program for small animals. I hope that in a few years pet  insurance companies will understand the opportunities to be present in Balkans also.

  1. What are you doing outside of professional life?

I like to practice winter sports, skiing and ice skating. Free time is dedicated to our family members 2 dogs and a cat. Also volunteer projects are taking part of my life.1468572_541932935880810_88657000_n

  1. Your opinion about Vets on The Balkans?

Sharing information between colleagues from this region is very important for the profession.Cooperation between vets from different countries were started and will continue on the benefits of our clients.

 

Do you have the Right Mindset to Success?

22854664_789230587923222_1976661440_n

Dr Elli Kalemtzaki

Do you have the Right Mindset to Success?

 

Helen is an exceptional veterinary professional. She’s been running her own veterinary practice for several years now. Her clients love her and have great trust in her.

However, she feels that she has hit a plateau because her business is not growing at the rate she would like. Finding ways to attract new clients is challenging, frustrating and intimidating for her.

She doesn’t really enjoy marketing, and her efforts have been ineffective because she’s uncomfortable promoting herself. She believes that being a good veterinarian should be more than enough to attract new clients to her practice. She relies on word of mouth to attract clients, but with growing competition in the veterinary profession this is no longer enough.

Does Helen’s situation sound familiar? Maybe you are facing similar challenges in attracting more clients and generating the full earnings potential of your business. Vet school did not prepare you for the business world. You had to go through long years of study to obtain the knowledge and skills required to be a good veterinary practitioner. And then you decided to start your own private practice. And this was an entirely new experience. An experience that requires a totally different skill set.

 

You want to make a difference! You are talented at what you are doing and you love helping your patients. But maybe you’re not attracting as many clients as you would like. You assume it will just happen naturally since you are good at what you do. But this is not always the case and this is why you need a marketing strategy in order to make more people aware of what you are offering, to show how you are better than competition and attract more of the clients that you prefer to work with.

 

Helen is in exactly this same place! And she too has been wondering what she could do differently with her business.

 

Marketing can be particularly challenging. Why? Because there’s always the possibility of rejection. When we put out our message and present our services there’s always a possibility that people might not be interested. This is why Helen, like many other veterinary practice owners, tends to avoid or resist marketing activities.

The first thing Helen needs to realize is that her own mindset is the major obstacle to the growth of her business. Like everything else in life, our attitude and mindset determine how we approach something and whether or not we succeed.

Tony Robbins says that 20% of the obstacles are around the mechanics of running a business and 80% have to do with your psychology – that is, your own fears, limits and stories about why your practice isn’t where you want it to be.

Most people think that they need to change their strategy to make real change. Whilst strategy is absolutely important, it’s not the first element to start with. Take a moment and think about your perceived limitations. They may be the “reasons” why you’ve convinced yourself you can’t achieve something.

Here are some of Helen’s limiting beliefs:

  • Marketing is bragging about what I am doing, it feels unnatural. It’s simply not me!
  • If I write this article on pet care nobody will like it and I will make a fool of myself
  • Clients get so frustrated from prices. They constantly blame me for charging them a fortune.

What does it cost Helen to think in this way? The cost is never moving an inch in her marketing, not attracting clients, and staying indefinitely stuck.

Helen has to realize that these thoughts are blocking her success and are probably not true; she needs to start exploring alternative and more realistic beliefs: “Marketing is about helping my clients learn what I am doing and to make informed decisions” or:  “Some people will like my article and might even think I’m smart for writing it.”

This shift of mindset through working with her marketing coach can have a more profound impact on Helen’s marketing effectiveness than anything else.

Marketing is a game of communication. Learning how to communicate in the most appropriate ways will get the attention and interest of your potential clients. The more you communicate, the more the relationship and trust builds.

Do You Want More Practice-Building Support?

 

e.kalemtzaki@gmail.com

 

Ask questions, get engaged, and let me know how I can help you!

INTERNARIONAL VETERINARY STUDENT’S ASSOCIATION – BUCHAREST

ivisaImpressive! These people are our ” future”. They are so young with strong passion and willing to grow and improve their knowledge. Vets on The Balkans will start campain to support their programs and to open new opportunity for them. We ask all our partner to support our new cooperation, because they are our future and they will make the life of our kids better.

 

 

President
Dragoș-Teodor Zamanpr

Senior Vice-President

Cristian Ionică

INTERNARIONAL VETERINARY STUDENT’S ASSOCIATION – BUCHAREST

-Non-profit organisation;

-Led by volunteer veterinary students around the world;

-Founded in 1951

– Our mission: “to benefit the animals and people of the world”

60 countries and 2 super-’national organizationsaaaaaa

BENEFITS

™Group exchanges;

™Individual exchanges (2-6 weeks)

™The annual congress (in summer)

™Symposium (in winter)

™Other local events

IVSA in Romania

IVSA Cluj – Napoca (2008)

IVSA Timișoara (2010)

IVSA Iași (1991)

 

IVSA București (2016)wsava students

 

 

 

Multilobular Osteochondrosarcoma

112 years mix breed dog, F

 

History:  presented for a large firm mass arising from the right side of the calvarium.

 

Findings: A dense, mineralized mass with a stippled appearance arising from the right side of the calvarium, with an approximate diameter of 6cm.

Because of the dense appearance of the mass, it’s hard to appreciate the degree of underlying osteolysis just with an Xray

A CT scan was recommended to evaluate local  invasion.2(1)

 

Diagnostic: the radiological appearance it’s of MLTB (multilobular osteochondrosarcoma)

 

Discussion: MLTB is an uncommon tumour that arises almost exclusively on the flat bones of the skull, mainly on the calvarium, maxilla and mandible and tend to occur in older medium and large breed dogs, although they have been reported in younger and small breed dogs, and have also been reported in cats. It is slow-growing and locally invasive, often recurring after excision. Metastasis may occur

Meet the Founder of VetConsultancy!

22854664_789230587923222_1976661440_n

Dr Elli Kalemtzaki

Meet the Founder of VetConsultancy!

 

I’m Elli Kalemtzaki, originally from Greece, but now living and working in Prague. I’m a qualified veterinarian, and have worked in the pet nutrition industry for more than 20 years, the last nine spent with a multinational in an international marketing role. My journey as a trainer and coach started in 2005 when in response to an impactful change in my personal life, I joined a self-awareness course.

It was during this 4 year course that I discovered the connecting threads between everything that was happening to me and most importantly, I discovered my calling. A Veterinary Leadership course in the US in 2006 was yet another life changing experience for me. I began to see my professional role with fresh eyes and became aware of a new mission to use my knowledge and skills supporting others to become successful. This realization transformed my career by giving me the confidence to move from a local position in a Greek company to an international role in a multinational company.

In the last decade I have traveled extensively and have met and worked with amazing people from many different countries and cultures. I gained valuable experience in coaching and mentoring individuals, leading development workshops and training business teams in different countries across Europe. A psychologist coach that I met during the Veterinary Leadership Course inspired me to become a professional coach. So I chose Adler International, an accredited school of coaching in Canada, and received my accreditation from the International Coach Federation in 2010. In the same year I became a certified facilitator of Team Coaching International. My fundamental belief is that we are all creative and resourceful beings, able to achieve the life we desire and deserve. I find the way the human brain works fascinating, and the fact that we can utilize our emotional and mental states to create our desired future absolutely thrilling. This is why I decided to add Neuro Linguistic Programming to my professional ‘tool kit’ and in 2012 I certified as a Practitioner of Neurolinguistic Programming. And then five years ago I relocated to Prague.

Whilst this new experience initially took me out of my comfort zone it also helped me to gain more clarity about my mission to help professional people uncover their unique talents and core values, and how to use strategies and tools to create a more fulfilling and successful life and business career. This is why in 2016 I launched Design for Life to offer coaching and training courses to working women in order to enhance their personal and professional skills and be happier and more successful. Then a year later I started out on an entirely new and independent journey, and left my corporate job to launch my own consultancy business. Combining my marketing with my coaching and training skills my focus now is to help veterinary practice owners build their dream practice, attract more quality clients and achieve their preferred work life balance. I look forward to connecting with you to help you see new possibilities in creating the business and life you desire!

 

Best wishes, Elli Kalemtzaki

Color dilution alopecia

 

Dr Daniela Bajenaru

Dr Daniela Bajenaru

Bajenaru Daniela (Tazy-vet), Bucharest, Romania

 

 

History

Jack, metis, 5 months, adopted from a shelter and treated against Parvovirus infection.
Prinary lesions: alopecia areas on the head, no other types of lesions were observed.
Two weeks after parvovirosis episode, dermatological problem has begun to progress2

 

Physical examination

Poor quality of the hair coat, the hair was thinner and dry
Symetrical hair loss on the auricular pavilions.
Progressive, partial, patchy alopecia and stubble
Non-inflammatory lesions
Non-pruritic31

 

 

 

Investigations

Wood’s lamp examination
Microscopic examination of the skin scrapings
Hair plucks (trichoscopy)
Fungal culture
Biopsy
Histopathological examination

 

Differential diagnosis

 

Dermatophytosis
Demodicosis
Pattern baldness
Color dilution alopecia and other fololicular dysplasias

Laboratory results

Fig.1 Trichoscopy

Fig.1 Trichoscopy

Wood’s lamp examination- Negative
Microscopic examination of the skin scrapings- Negative
Trichoscopy- irregular distribution and clumping of melanin which distorts the hair shaft.
Fungal culture- Negative
Fig 1,2,3,4- Trichoscopy examination: large grains of melanin which distorts the hair shaft.

 

fig 3

fig4

fig4

fig 2

fig 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Skin biopsy and histopathology reveal macromelanosomes, melanin clumping and follicular dysplasia.

 histopathology reveal

histopathology reveal

 

Diagnosis

COLOR DILUTION ALOPECIA

Treatment

There is no effective treatment for this disorder. The disease is progressive and incurable.
avoiding excessive brushing and shampooing
antimicrobial and keratinolytic products only when needed A high-quality DIET and essential fatty acids20170330_18223220170330_181007

Evolution

after 6 months

evolution

evolution

evolution