Information about our vet world on the Balkans

LEARN AND TRAVEL…..New story!

44621748_2183879854956768_4110182779130478592_nDr Jelena Micic has done he externship in Central Vet Clinic in Sofia Bulgaria. Let her share with us:

“Thanks to Vets on the Balkans and Luba Gancheva, I had a chance to spend time from 14th do 22nd October this year at a great Central Veterinary Clinic in Sofia, Bulgaria.

The clinic is amazing, with everything that you think you might need for veterinary medicine. Great place, which has stationary, x-ray, two amazing ultrasound machines, great laboratory, operating rooms, 24h service etc. and above all, experts in all fields of veterinary medicine, team that is not only made of great doctors but great people. First of all, I would like to thanks Dr Ranko Georgiev, who is amazing cardiologist with huge experience and unselfish of giving his knowledge to others. Open to all my questions and willing to answer all of them and explain everything from echocardiography, cardiology, x-ray and also abdominal ultrasound. As I started to write about cardiology, I had chance to meet Dr Marin Buchkov, a young doctor, who works alongside Dr Georgiev and probably is a future of Bulgarian cardiology. Now, about abdominal ultrasound that I am professionally interested in, I have to thanks Dr Miroslav Genov, expert in reproduction and Dr Kaloyan Voichev, who had patience for all of my questions and luckily I will attend at least one of his ultrasound workshops in the future. 44702825_443237652867945_6189133321910353920_n

Also, I saw some interesting cases in ophthalmology thanks to Dr Janica Dencheva. Interesting part of my externship was meeting Dr Gergana Georgieva and Dr Melinda De Mul, who are interested in exotic animals. Even I don’t have so much contact with these kind of pets, they explained me a lot of cases and give chance to see, for example, an ultrasound exams and x-rays of exotic. Also I had chance to see and learn from Dr Yordan Stoyanov, Dr Nadia Mihalopoulou and Dr Yordan Yordanov. Special thanks to (of course also great doctors) Dr Tome Peychinovski, dermatologist and ultrasonographer and Dr Iva Dimitrievska, who spend her free day for tour of Sofia with me , and gave me that privilege to meet their family and spend the beautiful day with them. 44797808_534785090279383_5473703989302263808_n

There wasn’t just work. We also spend very pleasant night out with delicious food, drink and talks, speaking in Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian and English. Contacts that I made during this stay at the clinic are, hopefully, something that will last for a long time. I was really lucky to have opportunity for this externship, thanks once again to Dr Luba Gancheva and great invention, Vets on the Balkans.”24246_103549239687374_288378_nlearn and travel

LEARN AND TRAVEL- Bulgarian vet in Belgium

Presentation3 Dr Anna Mircheva from United Veterinary Clinic has done her externship in Belgium with Dr Ann Criel.

She is telling us more about it:

“I had the great opportunity to spent the last week of September at Dierenartsen praktijk in Kermt, Belgium with the amazing Dr Ann Criel and her team.

The clinic is well structured and very good equipped. From the beginning I was greeted with smiles, open hearts and good clinical discussions.

Every morning began with some good coffee, discussion of the daily schedule and treatment of the hospitalized animals. Then we continued with the assigned operations and examinations.

Due to my interest of soft tissue surgery Dr Ann invite me in the operation room and I assist her from the first to the last operation. Without hesitation she answered to all of my questions, she explains every step of the operations, and she allowed me to do a lot of things by myself. She is the kind of doctor that you can learn a lot from, because she has the experience and the patience.Presentation2

Almost every day we had some great lunches – with Dr Ann’s family, team members and friends. I tried some delicious Belgian dishes in the company of amazing people.  Everyone that I met was really nice, smiling and intelligent – it was a pleasure to met all of them.

Presentation1

I want to thank Dr Ann because she opened her practice, her home and heart for me. Thanks to her team and family and of course one big Thank you to Vets on the Balkans- it was an amazing week.

Vets on The Balkans express our gratitude to our sponsor of the program for Bulgaria BLUE SKY COMMERCE! All is possible because of them.23316272_180060419216123_164154967085808895_n

WSAVA Targets Welfare with Release of First Global Guidelines for Companion Animal Practitioners

AW GuidelinesThe World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA) has highlighted the key role of veterinarians as advocates for animal welfare with the launch of its Animal Welfare Global Guidelines for Companion Animal Practitioners and the Veterinary Team.

The Guidelines, launched during WSAVA World Congress 2018 in Singapore, aim to bridge differing perceptions of welfare around the world and help veterinarians to tackle the ethical questions and moral issues which impact welfare. They also offer guidance to ensure that, in addition to providing physical health advice and therapy to their patients, veterinarians can advocate for their psychological, social and environmental wellbeing. The WSAVA already offers Global Guidelines in key areas of veterinary practice, including pain management, vaccination, nutrition and dentistry.

shane ryanDr Shane Ryan, incoming President of the WSAVA and former Chair of the WSAVA Animal Wellness and Welfare Committee, said: “As veterinarians, our responsibility extends far beyond the physical health of our patients. Animal welfare as a science is a new and rapidly developing discipline and veterinarians need current, evidence-based information to enable them to maintain the highest welfare standards and to provide knowledgeable, accurate advice for pet owners and communities.

“Our new Guidelines provide recommendations, checklists and other tools to promote optimal levels of welfare throughout the veterinary visit. They also offer guidance on increasing welfare beyond the doors of the clinic through outreach activities.”

He continued: “As levels of pet ownership increase in many regions of the world, including Asia, it is essential that veterinarians champion animal welfare and the WSAVA hopes that these new Guidelines will encourage our members to adopt best practice and set the highest standards.

“I would like to thank the members of the Animal Welfare Guidelines team, who worked so hard to create them and, of course, our sponsor, Waltham®, whose constant support was instrumental in enabling us to deliver them.”

The WSAVA has called on its members to develop an animal welfare charter for their members and to adopt the Guidelines into daily practice. 32 WSAVA member associations have already endorsed the Guidelines with more expected to follow shortly.  During 2018-19, the WSAVA will develop relevant continuing education (CE) and provide additional tools and translations of the Guidelines text.

The Animal Welfare Global Guidelines for Companion Animal Practitioners and the Veterinary Team are available for free download at: https://bit.ly/2D3RAoc

The WSAVA aims to advance the health and welfare of companion animals worldwide through creating an educated, committed and collaborative global community of veterinary peers.  It represents more than 200,000 veterinarians through 110 member associations.

 

WSAVA World Congress 2018 is being attended by more than 3,000 veterinarians from around the world and brings together globally respected experts to offer cutting edge thinking on all aspects of companion animal veterinary care.  WSAVA World Congress 2019 takes place in Toronto, Canada, from 16-19 July.

WSAVA Vaccination Guidelines Group Project Continues in Latin America

logo-white-backgroundArtboard-1The World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA) Vaccination Guidelines Group (VGG) has held a series of meetings and continuing education (CE) sessions in Mexico.  It was the final country visit in its three-year project aimed at enhancing levels of understanding of infectious diseases across Latin America and advising veterinarians on ‘best practice’ in vaccination.

PNCQE5648

Members of the VGG at one of the small group meetings in Mexico. Left to right: Dr Richard Squires (James Cook University, Australia), Dr Cynda Crawford (University of Florida, USA), Emeritus Professor Michael Day (Chairman, UK) and Dr Mary Marcondes (São Paulo State University, Brazil).

The VGG visit to Mexico took place during August 2018 and included meetings in Mexico City, Guadalajara and Monterrey. Committee members, including VGG Chairman, Emeritus Professor Michael Day, met with veterinary association leaders, academics, first-opinion practitioners and government regulators. They also made site visits to practices in all three cities. To support veterinary education, they delivered three evening CE sessions. The CE session in Mexico City was also live-streamed and made available to registrants for 30 days after the presentation. Altogether, over 2,000 veterinarians were reached by the live or on-line programme.

 

In advance of the visit, the VGG circulated an online questionnaire to collect data on veterinary demographics, infectious disease occurrence and vaccination protocols.  The survey was completed by 552 veterinarians with the data presented during the CE events.

 

The VGG develops globally relevant recommendations for best practice in the vaccination of dogs and cats.  It has also created the World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA) Global Vaccination Guidelines, the latest version of which was released early in 2016.  WSAVA Global Guidelines aim to support veterinarians by setting minimum standards for care and recommending best practice in key areas of veterinary medicine.

 

The WSAVA represents more than 200,000 veterinarians worldwide through 104 member associations and is focused on enhancing the clinical care of companion animals.

 

Commenting on the visit, Emeritus Professor Day said: “The VGG was delighted with the success of this visit to Mexico; a country with an estimated 45,000 veterinarians with students graduating from approximately 45 public and private veterinary schools.”

 

“Mexican veterinarians are accustomed to the principle of annual revaccination of dogs and cats with multicomponent products, but those we spoke to were excited by the new concepts of less frequent and individualized vaccination, incorporated into a preventive healthcare package for pets. Vaccine-preventable infectious diseases such as canine distemper and parvovirus infections, remain highly prevalent in Mexico.  Increasing herd immunity by improving vaccination coverage is clearly an important goal for the Mexican veterinary community.”

 

He added: “We are pleased to acknowledge the financial and logistical support provided by MSD Animal Health for the work of the VGG and for this visit in particular. Colleagues from MSD worked tirelessly behind the scenes to ensure that our independent scientific programme ran faultlessly in Mexico.”

 

The VGG ran a similar programme of activity in Argentina (2016) and Brazil (2017) and, during 2019, a final white paper on the findings of the Latin America project will be prepared for publication.

 

Ilinca Zarinschi, our tech vet, and Learn and Travel with Vets on The Balkans

38912475_442896726119256_1830507085800931328_nIlinca Zarinschi, a tech vet from Cluj, Romania has done her externship at Clinica Veterinara Lago Maggiore, Italy with Dr Luca Formaggini and his amazing team. She will tell us more about this experience:

 

“How it all started
I had the pleasure to meet Dr. Luba Gancheva for the first time at the Feline Medicine Congress in Bucharest, talking about her amazing project, Vets on the Balkans. I was so impressed I decided to approach her and find out more.
She explained to me that, as veterinary technician, I could improve my knowledge and skills by signing up for her amazing programme and she thought the best option for me might be Clinica Veterinara Lago Maggiore from Dormeletto, Italy.
So, two months later, I was finding myself flying over the Italian Alps not knowing what to expect from this new adventure.

39008939_498327340608678_2724608909053526016_nGetting there
I took off from Cluj-Napoca, Romania on the 1st of August.
After a long flight and many delays, I landed on Malpensa Airport. Alberto, one of the nicest vet techs I’ve ever met, was waiting for me. He drove me to the Clinic and then to the Crazy Pub where Dr. Luca, Dr. Sara, Dr. Marta and Dr. Giulia and Dr. Cecilia were waiting for me, with arms wide open. It was such a lovely evening, I could hardly wait for the next day to start!

38997000_1870135039950117_1318943628642484224_nThe clinic and the team
My first impression was that the clinic is well equipped and highly organized. Everyone was really eager to explain and share their knowledge with me, even though there were certain subjects I was not familiar with (like operating the Radiology and CT units).
I was very impressed with the surgical ward, Dr. Luca being one of those doctors that you can learn a lot from, having both the patience and experience to share from.
One thing that I am very grateful for is that they taught me how to preform and epidural, something I don’t get to do everyday.
We had various discussions about protocols regarding anaesthesia, vaccinations, post-op therapy and I learned a lot of useful information, which I already passed on to my colleagues.

38750936_433439873818272_1938692870990987264_nA little piece of Italian heaven

During the 12 days I was there, I got the chance to experience a bit of the Italian lifestyle, I travelled to Milan and explored the surrounding area. I fell in love with Italian cuisine and warm summer nights spent with the girls, we shared stories and experiences and the most important part, I got the chance of rediscovering myself and what I was capable of.
Saying goodbye
I was really sad I had to leave, it was the best experience I’ve had abroad, I would love to be able to go back one day and I highly recommend it to everyone who is willing to broaden their horizons.
A big special THANK YOU from the bottom of my heart to Luba, who encourages and empowers me everyday, to Dr. Luca and his lovely, amazing team, to Giulia – who is also the best room-mate that anyone could want , to Marta, Sara, Mariangela, Cecilia, Anna, Chiara, and Alberto (Nayra and Nina too). And a big thanks to Pamas Trading, for making this happen, of course. 12814393_1673705086236432_1339900710371625092_n
Also, I would love to remind you, guys, again, that we have better cannulas but you have prettier pink alcohol, haha.
My best regards and warmest hugs,

Ilinca, “the hybrid” vet tech

39017847_235779323940471_323580860395683840_n 39020903_1823190841099828_7740281119005736960_n 39095656_505572619865056_8953206293150040064_n 39096436_1326484624154769_2308858991083520000_n

WSAVA Endorses FVE/FECAVA Position Paper on Healthy Breeding Global companion animal veterinary association warns of the health and welfare risks of extreme breeding

 

Waltnew

The World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA) is the latest veterinary association to highlight concerns about the impact of extreme breeding in dogs by supporting a Position Paper launched in June 2018 by the Federation of Veterinarians of Europe (FVE) and the Federation of European Companion Animal Veterinary Associations (FECAVA).

The FVE/FECAVA Position Paper is a response to the explosion in popularity of dog breeds with exaggerated traits or genetic disorders and, in particular, those with extreme brachycephalic conformation, such as French and English bulldogs and pugs. While these breeds are increasingly popular with owners, they can suffer severe health and welfare issues.  The Position Paper calls for health and welfare to be given priority over looks and offers detailed recommendations to address both the rising demand for these dogs and the increase in supply. They include:

Measures to reduce demand

  • Addressing demand for brachycephalic and other affected breeds through educating owners about the health issues they face
  • Working with influencers, such as media and celebrities, to encourage owners to choose a healthy, high welfare dog which is suitable for their life style.

Measures to reduce supply

  • Introducing the mandatory registration of breeders, pre-breeding screening programs and the sharing of data on conformation-altering surgeries and caesarean sections
  • Educating stakeholders and revising breeding standards and practices to put the health and welfare of dogs first.

FVE and FECAVA have also produced an infographic explaining the causes and consequences of extreme breeding and listing a number of recommendations.

“Extreme breeding is a global concern with our members seeing the results of brachycephalic conformation in practice on a regular basis. The suffering it causes is beyond dispute,” said Dr Walt Ingwersen, President of the WSAVA.

“Following detailed review by our Hereditary Disease Committee, our Animal Wellness and Welfare Committee and the WSAVA’s Executive Board, we are delighted to endorse the joint FVE/FECAVA Position Paper and congratulate both associations on highlighting the issue and setting out a clear strategy to tackle it.  It builds on momentum established by the Brachycephalic Working Group (BWG), an initiative which brings together all of the major stakeholders in dog welfare in the UK to improve the welfare of brachycephalic dogs.”

Dr Ingwersen continued: “Lasting change requires commitment and collaboration between veterinarians, breeder associations and other stakeholders on a global basis.  We are ready to play our part and look forward to working with our colleagues in the FVE and FECAVA and our member associations to deliver on the recommendations made in the Position Paper.”

Dr Wolfgang Dohne, FECAVA President, commented: “We’re delighted that the WSAVA has offered its support to the joint FVE/FECAVA Position Paper. It is important for veterinarians to speak up on this important welfare issue and together we are stronger.”

The WSAVA aims to advance the health and welfare of companion animals worldwide through creating an educated, committed and collaborative global community of veterinary peers.  It represents more than 200,000 veterinarians through 104 member associations.  Its annual World Congress brings together globally respected experts to offer cutting edge thinking on all aspects of companion animal veterinary care.

 

Notes to editors:

 

The Federation of Veterinarians of Europe (FVE) is an umbrella organisation of 44 veterinary organisations from 38 European countries, representing a total of around 240 000 veterinarians. The FVE strives to promote animal health, animal welfare and public health across Europe.

The Federation of European Companion Animal Veterinary Associations (FECAVA) is the platform for the promotion of the professional development and representation of companion animal veterinarians in Europe. Founded in 1990, it currently has 40 national member associations and 13 associate member associations. FECAVA represents over 25,000 companion animal practitioners throughout Europe

Learn and Travel with Vets on The Balkans…. vets speak about it!

30706127_1869730476410629_6001501177299075072_n Dr Ivana Jovandin, veterinarian from Serbia, attened our education program Learn and Travel with Vets on The Balkans. She did her externship at Central Vet Clinic in Sofia, Bulgaria. Let her tell more about it:

 

Thanks to Vets from Balkan and Luba Gancheva, I had a chance to spend a week in April at a great Central Veterinary Clinic in Sofia, Bulgaria. The clinic is spacious, well equipped and the place where you can see the “state of art” veterinary medicine, and colleagues who work there are exceptional in various fields and together make a great team that is capable of finding the best solutions even for the most serious and difficult situations. It was a special pleasure to get to know and spend time with Dr. Melinda De Mul and Dr. Georgina Georgieva who work with exotic animals that I am professionally interested in. 30741558_1869730456410631_4343028306459754496_nIt was great to exchange our experiences, since in Serbia number of colleagues who are interested in exotic animals is very low. In addition to the work that is closely related to the profession, it was extremely useful to see the organization of work in such a large team where every person knew their task at all times, and everything was managed in order to provide better quality prevention, diagnostics and therapy of pets. Although the time I spent at the clinic was short, it will serve as motivation to strive to improve myself constantly, since the knowledge I got from working there with my colleagues is the experience that cannot be measured. 30712306_1869730686410608_5926180383073763328_nThe acquaintances and contacts made during the stay at the clinic are also something that is invaluable and something that will last for a long time. Enriched with this wonderful and unique experience, I believe that I have moved in the direction of what we all strive for, and that is to be, above all, better people and only then better veterinarians. And that’s why I am so thankful to Dr. Ranko Georgiev, Luba Gancheva and Vets from Balkan on everything!30688606_1864092660307744_6888695709592190976_n

Companion animal vets worldwide voice concern about new ‘pug’ film

Capture d’écran 2017-09-05 à 15.30.43Health and welfare impact of extreme breeding

Brussels, 25 June 2018 – Extreme breeding causes serious health and welfare problems: veterinarians are voicing their concern about the promotion of flat-faced dogs in films and social media, as this is likely to boost consumer demand for such dogs. Recent reactions were prompted by the announcement of the upcoming Disney film ‘Patrick’, in which a pug plays a feature role.

Pugs are a so-called brachycephalic or flat-faced dog breed, just like French and English bulldogs. Due to their extreme conformation, they are prone to many health issues,’ stressed Wolfgang Dohne, president of the Federation of European Companion Animal Veterinary Associations (FECAVA). While pets are bred this way to make them more appealing to buyers, ‘the reality is that these exaggerated features can lead to breathing difficulties, recurring skin infections, eye diseases and spinal or neurological problems, severely impacting their health and welfare.’

To raise awareness about health and welfare issues in breeding, FECAVA recently adopted a position paper[1] on healthy breeding, jointly with the Federation of Veterinarians of Europe (FVE).

Celebrities, social media and filmmakers strongly contribute to increasing the popular demand of certain breeds. Over the past few years, this has led to a real explosion in the number of brachycephalic dogs such as the French bulldog,’ confirmed Monique Megens, FECAVA representative of the joint animal welfare committee of FVE and the Union of European Veterinary Practitioners. ‘This is a worrying trend, as the exaggerated features of these dogs means that many need invasive surgery to allow them to breathe normally.’

Our profession is very concerned about this development, which not only has an impact on dog health and welfare but also on consumer protection,’ stressed Rafael Laguens, FVE president. ‘As vets, it is our role to educate our clients and to speak up and raise awareness about the consequences of exaggerated breeding. The FVE general assembly recently adopted a joint FECAVA/FVE policy paper on this topic.’

n6A-3EMf_400x400He applauded the recent initiative by the UK Brachycephalic Working Group (BWG), which had contacted Disney to try reduce the negative impact of its upcoming film.

The BWG, comprised of vets, breed clubs, welfare charities and academics, also expressed concerns that the film could lead to a surge in demand for pugs. Steps agreed by Disney and BWG include:

–     an added a welfare message to the credits section, explaining the health issues pugs face

–     leaflet distribution to journalists and the public at UK cinemas, raising awareness of leading health issues in the breed and explaining that ownership should not be undertaken lightly

–     images of pugs dressed in human clothing will not be used in marketing for the film

–     no merchandising of Patrick pug memorabilia

BWG will also support development of film industry initiatives to ensure that potential animal welfare implications are considered prior to future movies that prominently feature animals

On 26 June, FECAVA and FVE representatives will furthermore join forces with the EU Dog and Cat Alliance to raise awareness about extreme breeding in the European Parliament[2].

This is not just a European issue,’ confirmed Walt Ingwersen, president of the World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA), ‘Extreme breeding is a global concern. Our members see the results of extreme brachycephalic confirmation in practice on a regular basis and it is one of our top animal welfare concerns. We have therefore been in discussions with FECAVA and FVE with a view to supporting this policy paper on healthy breeding.’

logo-white-backgroundArtboard-1FECAVA, FVE and WSAVA fully support initiatives such as that of the BWG and urge filmmakers to refrain from using such animals – whether live-action, animated or online videos – as this will increase their popularity.

[1] https://www.fecava.org/files/ckfinder/files/2018_06_Extreme_breeding.pdf

[2] https://www.theparliamentmagazine.eu/event/animal-health-and-welfare-breeding-extremes-dogs-and-cats

 

Annual Congress of Romanian Feline Medicine Society and 3rd Anniversary Vets on The Balkans

1455057_1385809371666592_1582061359_nOn 24-25th of May 2018 in Bucharest, Romania, held 6th edition of annual congress of Romanian Society of Feline Medicine.
Vets on The Balkans was part of the congress to celebrate 3th birthday. It was an initiative organised by SRMF and Vets on The Balkans and 7 veterianrians from the region came to present their clinical cases, as they do in the journal in general.35970301_10217274258237800_7836393764011638784_n

The veterinarians who attend were:

36063836_10217274259037820_8158738992381034496_nDr Elli Kalemntazki from Greece. She is a graduate the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine of Aristotle University in Greece and held postgraduate degree in Public Health from The National School of Public Health in Athens, Greece. She is also Profesional Coach accreditated by the International Coach Federation since 2010 and a Certified Practicioner of Neuro Linguistic programming since 2012. Her subject was “Management of communications with clients”.

Dr Mila Bobadova is graduate the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine of University of Foresty in Sofia , Bulgaria. She is head manager of „ Dobro Hrumvane” veterinary clinics in Bulgaria. Mila paricipate ESAVS Dermatology courses.Her subject was „ Dermatolgy Puzzle”.

Dr Zoran Loncar from Serbia. Workin as full time Doctor of Veterinary Medicine Regional refferal veterinarian in Neurology and Orthopedic field. Member of ECVN, ESVOT, SCIVAC, SITOT, AO-Active member, jounior speaker. Author of sciantific publications. Clinical research surgeon. I can say the she showed 40 % of the pathology in cats through the point of view of Neurology.33399188_2115310181818038_3422930777036292096_n

Dr Daniela Drumea from Romania. Veterinary doctor, Dr. Daniela Luciana Drumea graduated the University of Veterinary Medicine in Bucharest, promotion 2014. Became a member of the non-stop veterinary clinic Tazy Vet in 2011, working as a veterinary assistant during her student years. Her passion and ambition to learn as much as possible about veterinary dermatology and the ongoing training at numerous national and international congresses and workshops led to the experienced and dedicated doctor that she is today.

Dr Bianca Bofan, PhD student, veterinarian in Centru de endoscopie si chirurgie minim invasive in Bucharest, Romania. Stgrongly involved in respiratory pathology in dogs and cats. Her subject was Interventional Treatment of Nasopharyngeal Stenosis- different approach on 2 cats.

Dr Constantin Ifteme, the head manager of Centru de endoscopie si chirurgie minim invasive in Bucharest, Romania. Member of VES&VIRIES,speaker, owner and manager of Vet Traing Center in Bucharest, Romania. His subject was Esophageal stricture-it is not always easy.

36046878_10217274257677786_6946097079919837184_nDr Luba Gancheva, owner of Vets on The Balkans presented dermatology case from Bulgaria, managed together with romanian vet Dr Rares Capitan, as a great job between balkans vets. Because we strongly believe that hand by hand we all be better.
On 24th as a precongress course, she present the difference between veterinary medicine between Romania and Bulgaria. Both countries has what to learn and in that way will be more easy and fast. The motto of the journal is „ Sharing is Caring”. 25 veterinarians participated the workshop.34193737_1704022103007044_964561530542620672_n

The organization of the Congress was in high professional level and more than 200 veterinarians attended.

We would like to express our gratitude to SRMF and Dr Tache Epure and Dr Valentin Nicolae for the opportunity to be part of it and to share these moments together.

See you next year on th 7th edition!33585435_1925558754173638_2662456110895595520_n

Support Grows for WSAVA Campaign to Secure Global Access to Veterinary Therapeutics

Medicine bottles17757322_1357464287609589_4350987275167613409_nThe World Veterinary Association (WVA), the Federation of Veterinarians of Europe (FVE) and the Federation of Companion Animal Francophone Veterinary Associations (FAFVAC) have all thrown their weight behind a campaign led by the World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA) to secure equal access to veterinary therapeutics for veterinarians around the world.  Ten WSAVA member associations have also endorsed it.

The WSAVA’s new Therapeutics Guidelines Group (TGG), which spearheads the campaign, has also appointed its first Chair, Dr Luca Guardabassi DVM, PhD, ECVPH.  Dr Guardabassi is Professor of One Health Antimicrobial Resistance at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark.

In a survey of its members conducted by the WSAVA during 2016-2017, 75% of respondents confirmed that that problems in accessing veterinary medical products hampered their ability to meet the needs of their patients and 20% assessed the impact of this issue as resulting in a severe restriction on their ability to provide a high level of care.

Dr Olatunji Nasir, Medical Director and CEO of the Truthmiles Animal Hospital in south west Nigeria, one of the countries affected, explained: “We face a Herculean task in trying access everything from basic medical consumables, such as syringes and needles, right up to veterinary drugs. Registration fees are very high because they are the equivalent of what is charged for human drugs despite the fact that the volume used is much lower.  The process of registering a new drug can also take up to 36 months which feeds demand for sub-standard products which are smuggled into the country.  The procedures for importing drugs are also cumbersome and impractical.”

The WSAVA launched its campaign earlier this year to tackle these problems and is calling on all of its member associations to endorse its Position Statement on the issue and to support its campaign. It is also calling on other veterinary associations to become co-signatories of the Position Statement.

 

Commenting, Dr Luca Guardabassi said: “Difficulty in accessing therapeutics to treat patients is a critical issue for companion animal veterinarians in many parts of the world.  It causes huge frustration and means that many thousands – probably millions – of animals do not receive optimum care.  It’s a situation which requires urgent change and we are determined to bring this about.

“We’re delighted that so many veterinary associations are supporting our campaign and are now preparing for a high-level summit meeting which will be held during WSAVA World Congress in Singapore in September.  At this meeting, we will bring together stakeholders from around the world to discuss the issues and recommend practical solutions.”

The WSAVA represents more than 200,000 veterinarians worldwide through its 105 member associations and works to enhance standards of clinical care for companion animals.  Its core activities include the development of WSAVA Global Guidelines in key areas of veterinary practice and lobbying on important issues affecting companion animal care worldwide.

Note to editors:

The following veterinary associations are co-signatories of the WSAVA’s Position Statement on therapeutic access:

  • Commonwealth Veterinary Association
  • FAFVAC
  • FVE
  • Federation of Asian Veterinary Associations
  • Federation of Asian Small Animal Veterinary Associations
  • Federation of European Companion Animal Veterinary Associations
  • Federacion Iberoamericana de Asociaciones Veterinarias de Animales de Compania
  • HealthforAnimals
  • World Veterinary Association

The following WSAVA member associations have endorsed its Position Statement on therapeutic access:

  • Estonian Small Animal Veterinary Association
  • Federation of Small Animal Practitioners Association, India
  • Ghana Private Veterinary Surgeons Association
  • Hellenic Companion Animal Veterinary Society
  • Kenyan Small Companion Animal Association
  • The Netherlands Association of Companion Animal Medicine
  • North American Veterinary Congress
  • The Philippines Animal Hospital Association

The Polish Small Animal Veterinary Association