Persistent right aortic arch

Presentation1Tsvetan Ivanov, Dimitar Ivanov, Vladi Kirilov – veterinary clinics “Dobro hrumvane!”- Sofia, Bulgaria

 

  1. Introduction:

The persistent right aortic arch (PRAA) is vascular ring which is formed by the aortic arch on the right side, with ligamentum arteriosum dorsolaterally, and pulmonary artery on the left and ventrally. This ring compresses the esophagus and trachea, which leads to swallowing difficulty. This malformation is with genetic prevalence and represents  error in embryogenesis of the dog. In 95% of the cases of this vascular ring anomaly, a constricting band prevents solid foods from passing to the stomach which prevents the puppy from thriving well.  In the remaining 5% of cases, a bizarre anomaly of the vessels is present (double aortic arch and aberrant subclavian artery), which may be difficult to correct and may not have a good prognosis.pic 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

Signs of this condition usually become apparent shortly after weaning, when a puppy begins eating semi-solid or solid food.  While milk will slide down nicely, bulky foods will “jam up” in the esophagus, leading to a stretched structure and the inability to get food down, hence the symptom known as regurgitation. Regurgitation involves the puppy producing undigested food and mucus through the mouth with no effort; the pup tilts its head down and the food and mucus simply roll out.  By contrastvomiting is an active process, meaning there are abdominal contractions (heaving) and a retching noise when food and mucus are expelled out the mouth.

Often complication of the regurgitation is aspiration pneumonia (AP), which leads to poor prognosis for the patient.

The standart therapy is surgical and is with good prognosis if there is no signs of AP. Before the surgery CBC and blood chemistry is required – WBC is important to rule out infection and the level of blood sugar should be in the reference values. The surgery can be open thoracotomy or thoracoscopy – the goal is to ligate and resect the fibrous annulus.

 

  1. Patient report

The patient is 2 months old german shepherd dog with history of vomiting after eating, according to the owners, but there is no problems with water drinking. The dog have diarrhea but is in good overall condition. When the dog sleeps there is strange noises from his neck and there is visible peristaltic waves in the level of 1-st rib.

We perform CPV/CCV/Giardia and the result was negative. The CBC and blood chemistry shows no difference from the reference values.

pic 2

pic 2

Then we made x-ray of the chest: pic 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Because of the typical sign of the chest, we performed and BaSO4 examination, and this was the result:pic 3

pic 3

pic 3

So our diagnosis is PRAA with no signs of AP. We performed surgery on the next day – it was open thoracotomy with ligation of the annulus.

Differentiation of the fibrous ring:

pic 4 pic 5 pic 6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s was administrated antibiotics, pain killers, sedatives and assisted feeding. We didn’t use thoracic tube after the surgery.

On the fourth day after the surgery, the dog was discharged. Three months after the surgery the owners still make assisted feeding, but the dog is not vomiting and is in good condition.

Main topic: “A new approach to radial nerve palsy in cats”. Clinical Case Series Report

380533_338242309525656_1915103081_nby the Orthopedic department of “Dobro hrumvane!”veterinary clinics,

Sofia city, Bulgaria

  1. Introduction

The radial nerve palsy is a pathology that is rarely seen in dogs, in comparison to cats, where it is more commonly seen, especially in young stray cats. The most commonly observed clinical picture in such patients includes paralysis of the antebrachial portion of the limb, the carpus, the manus and fingers. According to our personal observations, in about 25% of these patients the elbow’s neuro-muscular apparatus is also involved, in a different degree.

The patients demonstrate an external rotation of the antebrachial area in relation to the portion of the limb above the elbow.

The carpus and manus possess an additional and permanent external rotation in relation to the antebrachium, which causes the patients to use the rostral portion of the their carpus for stepping and weight bearing, which in turn inducts the formation of a chronical traumatic inflammatory proliferative granuloma in this area. For about a 25-45 days period, an impossible to overcome carpal hyperfelexion develops, to the point where the joint can no longer be returned to its physiological position, due to the shortening of the flexor muscle-tendon apparatus (see video 1 with cat Sonia 39 days after the trauma at https://youtu.be/SZoXfp8tMJ0 ).

A few therapeutic approaches are being advised for this pathologic condition worldwide: total limb amputation; stem cell therapy (with still controversial results); standard pancarpal arthrodesis (note that very often it is very difficult to execute procedure in the state of this disease and is almost always accompanied by a nonsatisfactory limb function end result).

None of the upper mentioned approaches for treatment of radial nerve palsy in cats, while trying to avoid limb amputation, was producing satisfying results in the patients with this problem, operated by our team. This is the reason we decided to test and implement a new “Dobro hrumvane modified pancarpal arthrodesis” procedure for the operative treatment of feline radial nerve palsy.

  1. Report patients base

 

Up to this moment, this modified by our team procedure has been done in 111 patients. In the first 11 patients we tried different but very similar to each other versions of the modification, and after patient 12 up to patient 111 (meaning exactly 100 patients) we were performing always one same version of the technique.

In 87 of these patients a follow-up postoperative monitoring for over one year has been performed (in 9 of them an approximately 5 year follow up was achieved, in 33 patients the follow up period was approximately 4 years etc.), in 11 patients the follow up period was between 4 months and one year and in 2 patients the follow up period was less than 4 months. In four of the operated patients, pre- or postoperative clinically relevant paralysis of the elbow region was also observed. As was mentioned earlier, 25% of feline radial nerve palsy patients demonstrate this (according to our observations in 23% of the patients it is already observed in the preoperative period and in other 2%, it develops a few weeks after the surgical intervention, with the reasons for that still being unclear). It should be noted that the majority of owners of patients with elbow area involvement preferred amputation over the experimental procedure.

 

 

  1. Surgical technique

 

The standard pancarpal arthrodesis general guidelines are being followed, but with the following modifications:

  • Straight 11̊ inclination non locking hybrid pancarpal arthrodesis plate has been used  (produced by Medimetal or Mikromed, delivered by VetWest). The plate contouring should be modified before the surgery and the inclination should become 21-22̊. Twisting of the distal portion of the plate internally in relation to the proximal portion of the plate is not recommended! For the fixation to the metacarpus 1.5 mm non locking screws were used (produced by Mikromed, delivered by VetWest) and for the fixation to the radius 2.0 mm non locking screws were used (produced by Mikromed, delivered by VetWest);
  • The proximal (os carpi radiale et ulnare) and distal carpal bones are being completely removed, this being done with extreme caution not the traumatize the adjacent magistral structures (especially blood vessels), which are located on the palmar surface;
  • The proximal ends of the metacarpal bones are being separated from one another;
  • The fixation of the plate to the dorsal surface of the third metacarpal bone is achieved the same way as in the standard technique, using 1.5 mm thick and 6 mm long screws, but the fixation to the radius is not applied on its dorsal, but on its medial/mediocaudal edge/surface, using 2.0 mm screws. The screw hole on the plate which is intended for os carpi radiale (note that this bone is actually removed  in the modified technique) is used for an additional 2.0 mm screw, placed in the distal radius. In other words, the whole metacarpal portion of the limb is being internally rotated around 85-95° (for the purpose of that an almost full blunt and careful separation of all soft tissues, including the magistral vessels and nerves in the distance between the carpus and the middle portion of the metacarpal bones, should be performed). After plating of the third metacarpal plate with four 1.5 mm non locking screws in neutral position the third metacarpal bone is being compressed to the radial distal This compression is easily achieved with the first screw, placed in the radius (not dorsal but medial/mediocaudal radial edge/surface – see below Xray picture Standard) thanks to the DC wholes of the plate types mentioned upper above. This screw is being inserted in the second 2.0 mm screw whole in distal to proximal direction, meaning the third plate hole in relation to the whole plate in proximal to distal direction. After that, 4 neutrally (not in  compression mode) placed screws are applied to radial bone in the following order: the most distal hole, the most proximal hole, the second hole in proximal to distal direction, the third hole in proximal to distal direction. It is recommended that at least two of the screws in the distal radius engage the distal ulna too, so the distal portions of the two bones could eventually be pulled together – the screws could be numbers one and two or four and five from proximal to distal, this possibility could be estimated only intraoperativelly;
    pic1

    POST-OP STANDARD X-RAY PICTURE AFTER PANCARPAL ARTHRODESIS “DOBRO HRUMVANE”

    • With this technique it is easy and recommendable to use a significant amount of autograft material – recommendable due to the large gap that is being created. This autograft is readily available, considering the amount of bone that is being removed in the previous stages of the surgical technique;
    • The final stage of the surgery includes almost full blunt separation of the skin from the underlying soft tissues in the designated area, along with skin plastic traction modification, which is intended to place the fifth finger in a more medio-cranial position. The skin sutures and respectively the skin incision should be placed in a position that is not exactly above the plate (eventually they plate and incision could be placed in a cross manner, but should not be on top of each other for their whole lenght). It is not necessary to perform tenodesis of the digital extensors or excision of some skin on the dorsal carpal area in orther to pull the fingers in extension. It shoud be noted that the upper mentioned skin traction used to “pull” the fifth finger in a more dorsal and medial direction (meaning that the fifth finger is placed adjasent to the dorsolateral, not solely lateral, surface of the fourth finger, under subtle tension that will not allow overlapping of the fifth finger) is extremely important because in some of the first patients, which underwent the still not perfected procedure, weeks to months after the surgery pressure necrosis developped in the fifth finger, which required further revison plastic surgeries.
    • In patients that have a very wild temper and where it is not possible to achieve two week long cage rest, postoperative splint could be placed. If this is done, additional amount of cotton could be used to help achieve the upper mentioned mediocranial position of the fifth metacarpus and finger;
    • NEO K-9 clinical formula is prescribed for a month and a two week long cage rest is done in more calm patients.

     

     

    1. C) Results – the last 100 cats (No 12 … No 111 made with identical technique) :

     

    C1) 96 patients that did not have (according to our clinical opinion) involvement of the elbow region pre- or postoperatively:

    – 95 patients with good limb geometry in stance and during walking, active involvement of the limb during walks and playing, owners completely content with the results 4 months up to 5 years after the surgery. 89 of these 95 patients had no postoperative complicatioons; 2 patients developed moderate postoperative infection that was easily treated; 2 patients demonstrated delayed healing of the surgical incision in the area above the plate (it took more than 5 weeks in both patients); 2 patients had delayed bone union, that took around 5 months to be completed;

    – 1 patient demonstrated unsatisfactory to this point level of weigt bearing and limb usage during walk and play. It is understandable that the owner of this patient is not completely content with the results, but is unfortunately refusing implant removal and further diagnostic procedures;

    – No cases with implant loosening, intra- or postoperative fracture, postoperative necrosis etc.;

     

    C2) 4 patients with clinically relevant pre- or postoperative involvement and paralysis of the motor unit of the elbow joint:

     

    1 patient without preoperative elbow problem, developed such around a month after the surgical intervetion and the problem was accompanied by the development of an additional low grade external rotation of the antebrachium in relation to the limb portion above the elbow. The main problem was presented by progressive loss of support of the ebow joint in extension during stance, which lead to the inability of the limb to support the body during weight bearing. The problem was resolved after a two week long active rehabilitation and machine physiotherapy and application of a light splint, which is suporrting (but not blocking) the elbow.

     

    – 1 patient (cat named Trun) with preoperative paralysis of the elbow joint, but accompanied by almost complete ankylosis of the elbow joint (only 15% of the normal range of motion was preserved, especially the extension was blocked) – see below the post-op pictures of cat Trun

    pic 2

    cat Trun

    pic 3

    cat Trun

    Although there was a serious accompanying problem, months after the surgery the owners are completely satisfied with the result. The patient is using the limb with no limitations during play, almost no limitations while running and with some limitations while walking – that last limitation is probably due to the constant flexed position of the elbow, which is exceeding the normal flexion angle of an elbow joint during walk, thus the animal is placing the shoulder of the affected limb under the level of the shoulder of the unaffected limb, during weight bearing (see video with cat Trun approx 3 months post-op at https://youtu.be/N9scMppZeyo ). The owners do not report signs of pain. Even though it is not right to make conclusions only on the basis of a single patient, this case gives us hope that patients with radial nerve palsy in combination with complete or partial elbow joint ankylosis have the chance to avoid amputation of the limb.

     

    – 1 patient with partial preoperative paralysis of the elbow joint which became more severe (around  50%) month after the surgery: the bones in the arthrodesis region achieved complete healing, but the elbow joint loses support during weight bearing,  thus the animal is placing the shoulder of the affected limb under the level of the shoulder of the unaffected limb, during weight bearing. Due to this the ptient is weight bearing the limb not on its pads, but rather on the carpal palmar angle surface. Because of that a chronic nonhealing skin lesion developed in this area over the time, which is intermitently bleeding. Up to this point, the owners are content with the result and do not wish to start rehabilitation or agree to a revision surgery, but for our team this result is unsatisfactory and it requires additional surgical and/or physiotrepautical intervention;

     

    – 1 patient (Doxy) wtihout preoperative involvement and paralysis of the elbow, which developed a progressive clinically relevant paralysis of the elbow a few weeks after surgery. This led not only to loss of support of the elbow joint during weight bearing, but also to constant progressing additional rotation of the antebrachium in relation to the humeral area.

    pic 4

    X-RAY PICTURES DOXY

    pic 6

    X-RAY PICTURES DOXY

    This rotation made the patient bear weight on the lateral surface of the carpal angle, developing a skin lesion there. This postoperative elbow joint paralysis did not resolve after a rehabilitation course. In order to correct the problem an elbow arthrodesis was performed, but not in a standard way. A “double-modified” elbow arthrodesis was performed: the boomerang plate produced by Mikromed and supplied by VetWest was placed on the lateral surface instead of the medial. Also, the antebrachial region was rotated 18 degrees internally, in relation to the humerus. We recommend very torough preoperative preparation: the execution of the technique is quite challenging, because the compression must be maintained and in the same time the “locking” of the anconeal process in the humeral fossa must be overcome, along with the congruency of the other ulnar structures and their corresponding radial structures – see below post-op X-ray pictures of cat Doxy after the second surgery, the elbow modified arthrodesis:

    It can be seen that the plating is on the lateral surface of the radius distally and on the laterocranial surface of the humerus proximally.

    Only a few hours after the surgery, the patient demonstrated excellent, pain free limb usage, with very good limb geometry and lack of difference in the level of the two shoulder joints during weight bearing. In the following days the patient started using the limb for playing too. At this point, 3-4 months after surgery, the patient is demonstrating completely satifying results (see video with cat Doxy approx 4 months post-op at https://youtu.be/X_rFEgrZink ). There are no signs of malunion, infection or other types of complications. The muscle mass in the shoulder area of the operated limb is similar to that of the non operated limb. Even if it is based just on one patient, the result of this case gives us some hope for surgical resolution for patients with modified or standard carpal arthrodesis, which have an acompanying or later develop severe elbow pathology of nonakylotic kind, as we know that the combination of carpal and elbow arthrodesis is not recommended in the known sources. For this patient especially we have an additional recommendation:

    1) The first recommendation that is applied to all 111 operated patients – considering that it is a patient with a paralysed limb it should live on a non- smooth surface (but also not on an abrasive one). On a slippery surface patients with Dobro hrumvane arthrodesis step with mild slipping which combined with the lack of sensitivity could cause in longer period skin lesion (see Video 2 with cat Zhivka approx 5 weeks post-op at https://youtu.be/hKKjmO9yWdI ).

    2) Additional recommendation especially for Doxy: the patient has two joints that underwent arthodesis, which means that a stress point is being created between the two plates, which in turn creates a significant risk for further fractures. This risk is further amplified by the fact that the arthrodesis procedures are reducing the shock absorbing function of the joints. Considering all of the mentioned above, the patient should live in an enviornment that lacks the risk of creation of serious vertical vector forces (such as jumping to or from high places). It should be noted that Doxy did exactly that, many times after surgery and no problem occured, but it is still highly not recommended.

     

    1. Conclusion

     

    The 100 clinical cases, with patients that underwent a similar modified pancarpal Dobro hrumvane arthrodesis procedure for the treatment of feline radial nerve palsy demonstrate a constant and satisfying result with very good return to function of the limb, pain free, with no discomfort. No following complications, including long-term ones are being observed and there is a very high level of owner satisfaction. We recommend this surgical technique and we would be glad to recieve feedback afer the completion of the procedure, either in the algorithm recommended by us, or with any additional modifications.

    pic 7

    Hari

    Even when the rotation of the metacarpal area in comparison to the antebrachial area is not 85-95 degrees the patients use the leg and the owners are satisfied but the leg geometry is in our opinion not good looking. Cat number 11, the last before the standartized 100 patients chain, named Hari is such a case, the rotation was 78-80 %, the operation was made approximately 5 years ago. As you can see at the videos made 4 years post-op the patient uses the left operated leg even during acrobatic jumping (see below picture Hari)

    and active playing (see video Hari 4 years after surgery at https://youtu.be/SfhzUtLr9ig ).

    1. E) Post scriptum

    A few years ago we presented the technique and its results, based on a few dozens of cases, on a VOG\BAVOT event. Ever since, a few colleagues from the Balkan region have sent us feedback with very encouraging results, after using the technique. One of them was our inconsolable friend, colleague and inspirator, D-r V. Vasilev, whose memmory and collosal contribution to the development of the veterinary meidicine in Bulgaria we would like to honor in the end of this report.

     

     

              Sofia                                      The Orthopedic department of

       March 2019                            “Dobro hrumvane!” veterinary clinics

     

” A neoplasia in left midbrain in dog”

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Dr Dimitar Ivanov

Dr Dimitar Ivanov,
Veterinary surgeon, Neurology specialist
Dobro hrumvane veterinary clinics
Sofia, Bulgaria

 

 

 

Case report

Dog, Bleki, toy terrier, M, 5 yo.

Came in the clinic on 11.04.2017 with left circle movements, menace deficit on the left and no reaction when stimulating the nasal mucosa.  On the right, spinal reflexes are decreased and there are no conscious proprioception.

Doubt for brainstem problem.

Differential diaggnosis:

V – vascular – it’s with peracute onset

I – inflamatory – it’s possible but no changes in blood sample

T – toxic – The dog did not take any medication, fed the same food and was not seen taking unusual things, but it’s not unpossible

A – anomalous – тhe dog is 5 years old and it is unlikely that there will be any manifestation of these diseases

M – metabolic – there is no other clinical signs or any changes in blood samples.

I – idiopathic – there is no seizures and vestibular signs

N – neoplastic – it’s more possible

D- degenerative – the dog is too young for cognitive dysfunction and too old for other degenerative diseases.

We made MRI on 12.04. and found a lesion in the left mesencephalon.

dhs dhs1 dhs2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The final diagnosis is neoplasia in left midbrain.

 

We started to prepare for surgery.

The antibiotic preoperative was Ceftriaxone 30 mg/kg i.v., Manitol 1 g/kg i.v. and Methylprednosolone 20 mg i.v.

The surgery was on 22.04.2017 and we made a left craniotomy and displacement of the temporal lobe dorsolaterally until the lesion was reached.

Bleki preoperative video:

dhs5

Pic 1

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Pic 2

The skull was open and we enlarged the hole with Kerrison rongeur (pic 1 and 2)

 

dhs8

Pic 3

dhs7

Pic 4

We aspirated the brain liquor and very slowly reverse the left temporal lobe.( Pic 3 and 4)

Pdhh1

Pic 5

When we found the lesion we punctured the cyst formation and drew the liquid contents.( pic 5)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The reason to do this surgery was to try to reduce the pressure in the tissue and to improve the dog’s condition.

After surgery we continued the antibiotics in the same dose and methylprednisolone in the same dose for three days. After then the dose was reduce to 2 mg /kg.  After few days the methylprednisolone was change with prednisolone and started to reduce the dose.

Until the methylprednisolone is reduced, the patient is better every day, improves motor activity, appetite, but fails to maintain a constant temperature. A corneal ulcer of the left eye appears – I guess the cause is a trauma to the left oculomotor nerve and reduced lacrimation.

On 28.04. we included one more antibiotic – amoxicillin with clavulonic acid.

On 29.04. the prednisolone was reduced to 0,5 mg/kg, the dog was with anisocoria (myosis on the right eye and mydriasis on the left). On 30.04. the circle movements on left started again.

We tried to find Lomustine for chimiotherapy but we couldn’t and increased the dose of the prednisolone to 2 mg/kg

 

Bleki 22 days after surgery:

 

 

Bleki 23 days after surgery

The dog is good, he walk normally but when he stops, he start to make circle movement on the left.

 

Double plated TPLO in oversized dogs

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335946_482726875077198_931496419_o

Dr. Tsvetan Ivanov

Dr. Tsvetan Ivanov, “Dobro hrumvane!” veterinary clinics, Sofia, Bulgaria

Introduction

The most common cause of rear limb lameness in the dog is rupture of the cranial (anterior) cruciate ligament. This derangement results in degenerative changes (osteoarthritis) in the stifle (knee) joint, including cartilage damage, osteophyte (bone spur) production, and meniscal injury. The Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteotomy (TPLO) has proven effective in returning these deranged stifles to full function.

Developed by Dr. Barclay Slocum, TPLO was a radical procedure for addressing canine ACL injuries. Now in existence for over 20 years, the surgery has proven itself, time and time again, to be an extremely effective long term solution for addressing cruciate ligament injury in dogs.

Part of the positive indications for TPLO are:

  • Bodyweight:

TPLO is most frequently performed in medium to giant breeds. Greater bodyweight is a positive indicator for selection of TPLO as a treatment option. The procedure can be performed and on small dogs and even cats, but then should be make exact discretion the potential benefits and complications.

  • Age:

Cruciate ligament degeneration is seen increasingly in young large breeds, in some cases within their first year.

Minimising osteoarthritis in the long term is a priority for these young dogs. Many surgeons believe that this leads to the TPLO being the technique of choice, although long term comparative studies continue to investigate this. These cases frequently show bilateral degeneration, and partial cruciate ruptures are common.

The procedure is good option for dogs over 6 months of age, with progression of ossification of proximal tibial growth plates.

  • Partial ligament rupture.

Cases of partial ligament rupture show a very rapid iprovement following TPLO. Importantly, they typically do not progress to complete ligament failure as TPLO acts to neutralise the forces on the cranial cruciate ligament.

TPLO is widely accepted to give the best functional outcome, in the short to medium term, and has enabled working/performance animals to return to high functional standards.

  • Excessively sloping tibial plateau:

Average plateau angles range from 22°-26°, but angles from 15° are still remain a TPLO candidate with good post-operative outcome. However, in cases with an increased tibial plateau angle, TPLO has proved particularly beneficial.

Case studies have advocated TPLO as the technique of choice for even small breeds with excessive tibial plateau slopes. In some of those cases the amount of angular correction required leads to a Wedge resection technique being favoured over the Slocum(curved-cut) TPLO.

  • Cranially translocated tibial crest.

Occasionally the stifle will rest with the tibia cranially translocated following cruciate rupture the tibial crest is  palpated cranially, the patella tendon is less distinct, and the first movement during cranial drawer is backwards, often associated with a dramatic degree of movement. In some authors experience these cases may return to cranial translocation with significant recurrence of lameness weeks after extracapsular lateral fabella suture placement. In those cases, in a limited number of procedures, TPLO have shown better outcomes.

Overall, the good TPLO candidate is medium to large breed dog, from 6 months and plus, active, with need of full functional restoration of the limb.

The Case:

 

This is the case of Hades. He is oversized cane corso, 6 years old, bodyweight is 78 kg and he suffers from hip arthrosis of the right hip in result of hip dysplasia and chondroma of right carpal bones. He came with lameness on the right rear limb from few weeks, which is worsening. He had and positive “sit and drawer tests.

This is video of his walk:

The diagnosis was cranial cruciate ligament rupture.65 6My favorite procedure is TPLO, but definitely no one can be sure that, the standard procedure can give good outcome with this size dog. Furthermore, the dog have and two other problems on the right side. We were afraid from implant failure so we decided to make insurance. Instead only the TPLO plate we placed and second DCP 3.5 mm plate. The original idea was to use 3.5 screws for the 2-nd plate, but because of the risk from caudal cortex fracture the most distal three screws was 2.7 mm

 

 

 

0 post op DP

Immediately postoperator

0 post op LL

Immediately postoperator

Those are intraoperative pictures and the immediately post-op pictures:

2

surgery

4

surgery

1

surgery

 

Video 14 day after the surgery:

 

X-ray pictures 45 days after the surgery:

45 dni post op - LL

45 days post op – LL

45 dni post op

45 days post operator

And this is the final result – 6 months after the surgery:

240 days post op

240 days post op

Video:

Discussion:

 

The TPLO remains one of the best surgically ways to manage CrCrLR even in oversized dogs, even with concomitant diseases of the locomotor system.

The most important thing is every surgeon to make optimal assessment of the patient’s status and to remember that every case is specific.