Friends of Vets on The Balkans- Dr Liliya Mihaylova

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Dr Liliya Mihaylova

Today we will present to you another friend of Vets on The Balkans, Dr Liliya Mihailova.

 

She is veterinary surgeon at the biggest veterinary clinic in Varna, Bulgaria. One of the most famous cardiologist in Bulgaria, teacher and friend of many many vets in Bulgaria and not only.

Let her friends and colleagues discribe her:

 

 

 

78508821_961764280857493_2739612204776030208_nLUIGI VENCO, DVM , SCPA, Dipl EVPC, Pavia, Italy

 

“When I first met Liliya Mihaylova, I immediately thought she was shy. Then working with her I realized that she is not shy at all. She is an incredibly sweet and respectful person. And the same sweetness and respect she puts into her profession and into relationships with the people around her. We had the opportunity to work together for months, we met each other at courses and conferences in every part of the world and she is always smiling. I was able to appreciate how brilliant she is as a veterinarian but if ask me if I prefer her human or professional aspect I can tell you that I prefer both and that if they are in the same person and if you’re lucky enough to be her friend , you’re very lucky, as I am”
 

61339937_10219962671486451_5841102552728338432_oDr Gergana Vitanova, veterinarian in veterinary clinic Albaitar, Ruse, Bulgaria

“Life meets you with different people. Some of them manage to provoke you to do your best with their example. Dr. Mihailova is exactly that. There is no way that you will not be infected by this difficult combination – uncompromising professionalism and the rarely found kindness.”

 

 

 

 

25442892_719068364966330_5338298658327192274_nFlorin Delureanu,DVM, MRCVS, veterinarian from Romania

“I met Liliya in the summer of 2017 through a veterinary medical event in Bucharest. During the lunch break she sat next to me and asked me where and for how long i work as a veterinarian and if the clinic where i work is a big one. Even though the discussion from that day was short, she left me a good impression. About 5 months later, in the winter of the same year, I decided to contact her with the intention of spending my winter holidays in the clinic where she works (United Veterinary Clinic-Varna) to develop even more my knoledge. I was pleasantly surprised by the speed and promptness with which she answered me, the answer being a positive one. After arriving in Varna, Liliya was very polite and intended to give me a lift from the bus station to the clinic. When i arrived at the clinic, i was very excited and wanted to help because there were so many patients waiting and Liliya was very open minded from day one and offered me the opportunity to participate with her in a few surgeries. She also had a pleasant attitude both at work and outside of work, was very friendly and gave me many tips. She has contributed a bit to my present by encouraging me and supporting me to move to another country (England) to develop myself. Because she is in a continuous development especially in the field of cardiology and endoscopy, i can say that she has given me many details, tips and tricks regarding this field! I have a lot of respect for Liliya, and i am grateful for the nice experience she offered me i am honored to know her!”

 

 

78608501_2993069480722815_5314071698566283264_oDr Spas Spasov, veterinarian at veterinary clinic Dr Antonov, Varna, Bularia

“What can I say about Lily.

We’ve known each other for almost 7 years.

She is one of the sweetest people I know, dedicated to her work and friends.

You can always count on her, both for work and if you just want to talk to her about things other than work.

Lily is a person who motivates us to be better professionals and people.

Her desire for continuous development is inspiring.

What else can I tell you about her … she’s always late, hahaha , she’s often quite distracted because she thinks about 100 things hahaha.

Big animal lovers: she has a dog, a cat, two parrots and a fish.

Quite often, she takes care of a wounded wild boar, for example, an owl, a gull, a sparrow, a pigeon, etc. .

When you go to visit her, you actually go to a small home full of friendly animals.

 

Of course, these things are not enough to describe the Lily as a person and a friend.

In conclusion, Lilia is a wonderful doctor and friend, and I am more than happy to have   her in my life”

 

THANK YOU Liliya for being such a good friend of Vets on The Blakans!59910676_10219811414505121_5136066701674151936_o

 

FIRST REPORTED CASE OF SYMPTOMATIC DIROFILARIA IMMITIS INFECTION IN A HOUSOLED DOMESTIC FERRET (MUSTELA PUTORIUS FURO) IN BULGARIA.

32480642_1950070525005966_7673581144482250752_nMihaylova L. DVM1.

1Veterinary surgeon in United Veterinary Clinic Bulgaria Varna 9000,

email: lillyvet@gmail.com

Heartworm disease in dogs and cats is well known in many European countries including Bulgaria. There are furthermore studies confirming dirofilariosis in wild foxes and Canis aureus i reports about heartworm disease in domestic ferrets in our country.

History

A 5 year old male, entire, pet ferret (Mustela putorius furo), weight 0,9 Kg was presented with labored abdominal breathing. The owner reported reduced appetite, difficulty breathing and restlessness. The ferret was not able to sleep or lie down for more than few minutes.  The ferret was used to live mainly indoor and allowed during the summer to be outside in the garden, for just few hours during the day, to be exposed to natural sunlight.

Clinical presentation and collateral exams

On presentation ferret was lethargic with abdominal breathing and breathing rate up to 90/minute. There was clear subcutaneous edema more prominent on the front and hind legs and ventral part of the abdomen. Mucous membranes were pale, while CRT was not possible to be assessed. Heart rate ranged in between 120-180 bpm. Pulses were weak even if assessing on the femoral artery was difficult due to the subcutaneous edema. Abdominal palpation was unremarkable, lymph nodes were normal in size. Thoracic radiograph showed loss of detail into thoracic cavity consistent with pleural effusion. Thoracic US was performed confirming pleural effusion and one hundred and twenty ml of modified transudate was drained. Brief screening echocardiography showed normal left atrium and left ventricle and severely dilated right atrium containing double line hyperechoic objects suggesting the presence of few adult Heartworms. (Fig 1). Right atrium was larger than left atrium. Doppler study and any further detailed investigation of the heart were not possible to be performed due the fact ferret became aggressive and owner declined any sedation or anesthesia. Snap® HTWM Antigen test (Idexx) on blood yielded negative result and at fresh blood smear examination no microfilariae were possible to be identified.  Knott test was not possible to be performed due to limited amount of sampled blood.

Diagnosis

On the basis of echocardiography findings diagnosis of HW disease was done.  Negative HW antigen test was assumed to be due probably due to juvenile D.immitis worms and right atrium localization to the small size of pulmonary arteries as described in cats and ferrets.

Therapy and Follow up

The ferret was treated with Advocate® spot on >4kg (half tube), Furosemide 2mg/kg twice a day and Prednisolone 1mg/kg daily both of them orally. The ferret was stable on that therapy. He was eating and drinking well regain the normal body weight 1.5 kg. no breathing difficulties were reported. He was rechecked 35 days after initial presentation. Echocardiography showed right mildly dilated atrium but no presence of HW (Fig 2). Only 10 ml of fluid was drained from the thoracic cavity. From that time he was stable with no owners complain for 6 month. Suddenly he developed respiratory distress and on presentation was with cyanotic membrane. Pulmonary thromboembolism connects to HW disease was suspected Owner elected euthanasia and no more investigations. Necropsy was declined.

Comments

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Fig 1

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fig 2

This case shows the in endemic area even indoor domestic ferrets may be infected by Dirofilaria immitis. and that the disease is difficult to be diagnosed and can lead to death. Suspicion about this problem and monthly chemoprophylaxis should be warranted in this situation as in dogs and cats.